Book review: In the Heart of the World (Mother Teresa)

Via on Apr 8, 2010

HeartoftheWorldcover

This moving collection of stories and other writings from Mother Teresa demonstrates the simplicity and utter devotion to doing good possessed by one of the most venerated nuns of all time.

In the Heart of the World collects some of her most tender stories, devotional prayers, and profound thoughts not only about her faith, but also about life, the spiritual path, and simple basic kindness towards one another. At only 105 pages, it would be easy to breeze through this book in one sitting, but that would be missing the point. To truly read this book is to take the time to contemplate her message rather than view it as a simply a compendium of religious thought. Eloquent and direct, the words of Mother Teresa are as relevant today as when she was doing her work.

From New World Library and available from your local, independent bookstore. (Shop local… shop independent… tell ‘em you saw it on Elephant Journal!)

This moving collection of stories and other writings from Mother Teresa demonstrates the simplicity and utter devotion to doing good possessed by one of the most venerated nuns of all time. In the Heart of the World collects some of her most tender stories, devotional prayers, and profound thoughts not only about her faith, but also about life, the spiritual path, and simple basic kindness towards one another. At only 105 pages, it would be easy to breeze through this book in one sitting, but that would be missing the point. To truly read this book is to take the time to contemplate her message rather than view it as a simply a compendium of religious thought. Eloquent and direct, the words of Mother Teresa are as relevant today as when she was doing her work. From New World Library and available from your local, independent bookstore. (Shop local… shop independent… tell ‘em you saw it on Elephant Journal!)

About Todd Mayville

Todd is a single dad of four diverse and lively kids, and is an English teacher and climbing team coach at a local public high school. A rock climber, cyclist and avid reader, Todd also practices yoga and meditation as often as he possibly can, which helps him stay at least a little centered and sane.

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6 Responses to “Book review: In the Heart of the World (Mother Teresa)”

  1. Thanks, Todd.

    I assume this book doesn't deal with all the things that came out later about her deep doubts about God and her inner struggles that were masked all her life by the image in the book above.

    I don't mean to say this detracts in any way from the power and impact of what she did with her life. If anything it just makes it all the more remarkable, and, of course, many saints had this same inner battle with their faith.

    But it's still an important part of the story, and I still find it troubling in a way that someone who led such an exemplary life didn't get a more enduring peace from it.

    Anyone else know more about this? I haven't done my homework.

    Bob Weisenberg http://YogaDemystified.com

    • Todd says:

      No, it doesn't address those; more a collection of her writings in general… very devotional. It's actually good to know she had questions and struggled with her faith: makes her more "real" to me in a sense… what good is a faith not questioned or doubted?

      • I agree. Faith questioned and confirmed is always more convincing than blind faith.

        But there's a big difference between doubts and torment. It would be very discouraging to me if Mother Theresa didn't achieve a certain peace of mind and happiness in the end from her work. Again, it wouldn't make it any less wonderful or impressive or meaningful, just very sad to me.

        Bob Weisenberg http://YogaDemystified.com

  2. [...] in the world. What if we thought of our well-off investor neighbor in the same plane of purpose as Mother Theresa? In the very least, it would warm our own hearts that we live next to such a [...]

  3. [...] 1. With whom do you feel connection or belonging? Feel cared for or loved? Feel at home, safe, secure? Some people immediately identify an individual—a family member, friend, healer, or teacher—whose presence creates the feeling of “at home.” For others, home is a spiritual community, a 12-step group, or a circle of intimate friends. Sometimes the feeling of belonging is strongest with a person who has died, as for Ram Dass with Maharajji, or with a person you revere but may never have met, such as the Dalai Lama, Gandhi or Mother Teresa. [...]

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