Book review: Freeing the Body, Freeing the Mind: Writings on the Connections Between Yoga & Buddhism (Michael Stone, ed.)

Via on Nov 24, 2010

This fascinating anthology gathers some of the best essays exploring the common roots and goals of yoga and Buddhism that are available.

The rather arbitrary division between yoga and Buddhism has been the subject of many articles online and in print, but in spite of what seems to be a plethora of views on the subject, Stone gathers together works from a wide range of luminaries who are able to grant fresh and historical perspectives on the subject without rehashing previously made arguments.

While Freeing the Body, Freeing the Mind has the potential to be rather academic, the fact that each writer is also a practitioner keeps the book from becoming didactic and simply an exercise in analyzation of philosophies. This book is highly recommended for those who practice either yoga or Buddhism or both and who are looking to further explore the mutualities between the two. From Shambhala Publications and available from your local, independent bookseller. (Shop local, shop independent, and tell ‘em you saw it on Elephant Journal!)

About Todd Mayville

Todd is a single dad of four diverse and lively kids, and is an English teacher and climbing team coach at a local public high school. A rock climber, cyclist and avid reader, Todd also practices yoga and meditation as often as he possibly can, which helps him stay at least a little centered and sane.

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4 Responses to “Book review: Freeing the Body, Freeing the Mind: Writings on the Connections Between Yoga & Buddhism (Michael Stone, ed.)”

  1. Thanks, Todd. I have heard good things about this book. It's good to hear your endorsement.

    Bob W.

  2. [...] Freeing the Body, Freeing the Mind: Writings on the Connections Between Yoga & Buddhism (Michael Stone, ed.) The rather arbitrary division between yoga and Buddhism has been the subject of many articles online and in print, but in spite of what seems to be a plethora of views on the subject, Stone gathers together works from a wide range of luminaries who are able to grant fresh and historical perspectives on the subject without rehashing previously made arguments. [...]

  3. [...] spirit trumps body idea seems lacking. At best, both spiritual and human beings and experiences seem of equal [...]

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