Book review: The Language Police.

Via on Feb 21, 2011

How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn (Diane Ravitch)

This intensely thought-provoking book from educational historian Diane Ravitch takes a look at the politicization of not only the textbook industry but of education itself.

Through her research, Ravitch indicts both right wing and left wing groups for watering down the education of American children with the apparent intent of raising test scores, but with the result of making education bland, boring, and seemingly meaningless. Affecting not only English and literature textbooks, but also social studies, science, and even math, censors and those with a political agenda manage to turn education into a banal exercise in rote memorization while discouraging critical discourse and discovery.

Highly recommended for teachers, parents, students, writers, editors…for anyone with even a passing interest in the education of American youth. From Alfred A. Knopf and available from your local, independent bookstore. (Shop local, shop independent, and tell ‘em you saw it on Elephant Journal!)

About Todd Mayville

Todd is a single dad of four diverse and lively kids, and is an English teacher and climbing team coach at a local public high school. A rock climber, cyclist and avid reader, Todd also practices yoga and meditation as often as he possibly can, which helps him stay at least a little centered and sane.

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13 Responses to “Book review: The Language Police.”

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Todd Mayville and Todd_M, Red Fox. Red Fox said: Book review: The Language Police: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn (Diane Ravitch) http://bit.ly/fK6VMf [...]

  2. [...] grow up without ever learning another language, and I feel that is unfortunate. Maybe they had a one hour language class during the day in middle school or high school, but how much can a child take away from that one [...]

  3. home tutor says:

    this book is good for language

  4. hank freid says:

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by Todd Mayville and Todd_M, Red Fox. Red Fox said: Book review: The Language Police: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn (Diane Ravitch) http://bit.ly/fK6VM. hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid hank freid

  5. I feel that is unfortunate. Maybe they had a one hour language class during the day in middle school or high school

  6. thanks for the post i like it

  7. williamjones says:

    this book is good for language
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  8. alvin says:

    Maybe they had a one hour language class during the day in middle school or high school.office water coolers

  9. I feel that is unfortunate. Maybe they had a one hour language class during the day in middle school or high school

  10. Dave Angelo says:

    Maybe they had a one hour terminology category during the day in junior secondary university or high school

  11. CLICK BUY says:

    i would like to say that we should encourage language students so that they can learn more and more…… they should have language classes for there level to come up their deficiencies

  12. Techgoms says:

    This article is full of information I appreciate the thinking and style of writer.I agree that after reading this article ,students come to know the deficiencies of their language.keep it up.

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