A Christian & a Buddhist chat together. {Funny video}

Via on Aug 24, 2011
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About Tobye Hillier

Originally from England, Tobye Hillier has lived in Ireland for over 17 years, living in a small seaside town called Greystones 20 miles south of Dublin. A qualified Karuna yoga teacher (RYT 500), Tobye also plays a pretty darn funky 5-string bass guitar and likes to sing in other peoples' showers. Empathic and intuitive, He likes to bend Yoga to suit people and not the other way around.

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11 Responses to “A Christian & a Buddhist chat together. {Funny video}”

  1. Roger Wolsey Roger Wolsey says:

    more accurately, a conservative, evangelical (and apparently Pilgrim) Christian meets a patronizing Buddhist.

    • Ben Ralston Ben_Ralston says:

      I dunno, I'd say that the Buddhist in this case is just very patient… : /

      • Roger Wolsey Roger Wolsey says:

        it's sort of funny, but only because one side is portrayed in rigid, cartoonish form while the other is depicted as nuanced and balanced. A more accurate title would be, An uninformed and not particularly self-aware, conservative, evangelical (and apparently Puritan/Pilgrim) Christian meets a patronizing Buddhist. my critique is less with the Buddhist depicted in the clip, and more with the creator of it who clearly has a grudge and a less than whole understanding of Christianity. In the cartoon, the Christian is the aggressor, but the person who made the clip is actually the aggressive one.

  2. elephantjournal says:

    #
    Laura Maschal now you're just talking sh*t! lol

    #
    Roger Wolsey my critique is less with the Buddhist depicted in the clip, and more with the creator of it who clearly has a grudge and a less than whole understanding of Christianity. In the cartoon, the Christian is the aggressor, but the person who made the clip is actually the aggressive one.

    #
    elephantjournal.com Yes, although I've had this very debate online with a guy who wanted to know where I was going when I died… he got very aggressive and told me i was going to hell unless I repented. I'd told him it didn't matter where i went when I died and i was more interested in where i was going when I'm alive :) So this cartoon pretty much sums up the majority of my experiences like this…. apart from people I've talked with in Unity church, who all seem to be (like yourself Roger) open to lots of different ideas. ~Tobye.

    #
    Roger Wolsey fair enough. i've had similar experiences with conservative Christians. (for clarity's sake, I'm a United Methodist, not a part of Unity Church)

    #
    Molly Moblo Perusse The key is being open to lots of different ideas, like Tobye said. So sad to me when people are not.

  3. elephantjournal says:

    Amen, Roger–and Tobye. My experience, as a Buddhist, with religious dialogue started early, with some of the most intellectually interested Christians and Jewish teachers…and I'm sad to say that level of openness and delight isn't common among any of us, whatever religion or path we tread.

    Key seems to be to understand that there are different paths to the mountaintop, or the present moment—instead of thinking we "own" the right way.

    Merton's one of my heroes in this regard. ~ Waylon

  4. Toddofthedesert says:

    nothing worse than a Buddhist who thinks THIS is how all Christians think. This Christian cut his teeth on Madyamika, Thomism and Al-Farabi and left the thinking of this Pilgrim behind quite a few years ago. If Buddhism is really about knowing what is real, please know we are here and that we know as much or about you than you do about us.

  5. jhon baker says:

    hahahahaahaha! it's funny, a joke – get it?

  6. Misa Derhy says:

    Hey Tob,
    I know exactely what do you mean, I have similar experiences from catholic and jewish point of view…will not even comment how I could live both ot if:) But you are very right in the fact, that forgiveness is great point of departure and Love is the continuation. We all all striving for the same, Happiness and Freedom, and the way toward it is not important, we will meet all there one day. What is important is the tolerance to our differences and acceptance of what unite us.
    And…yes, JOKE, but are we able to smile about ourselves?

  7. [...] Stephen Batchelor’s book Confessions of An Atheist Buddhist I ran across a vignette where the author is talking with a Buddhist about mandatory military duty. [...]

  8. Tobye Hillier yogi tobye says:

    I even had one lady once refuse to call me Tobye because "It's not a christian name!" she called me Tony instead…. I didn't complain.

    But she had no knowledge that Tobye is a greek translation of the hebrew word for God is good.

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