Nutritional Yeast: What it is & What to do with it. ~ Aylin Erman

Via on Aug 1, 2012


20 Ways to Use Nutritional Yeast.

Taking an odd ingredient and finding even more unusual uses for it.

It’s not so much that the following uses are particularly unusual, but rather that nutritional yeast itself is an odd ingredient. It’s gaining popularity among foodies for its cheesy taste and nutritional benefits, but it still has a way to go in terms of becoming the pantry staple it’s meant to be. Nutritional yeast (nooch) is one of the only non-animal sources of vitamin B-12. It only takes 1/2-1 tbsp of nutritional yeast to get the daily requirement for B-12. Nutritional yeast is also an excellent source of iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, chromium, selenium, and other minerals as well as 18 amino acids, protein, folic acid, biotin, and other vitamins.

And don’t worry about the yeast fermenting in your gut. It’s deactivated, so it will not give you the bloat. This is what distinguishes it from Brewer’s Yeast, which has not been deactivated.

Popcorn

As if popcorn couldn’t get any more addicting, nooch had to get involved. Sprinkle the powder along with a drizzle olive oil and a dash of sea salt onto popcorn just popped for a cheesy touch. Add other spices, such as garlic powder, dried thyme or dried rosemary for an even more gourmet experience.

Pizza

Skip cheese and sprinkle a light layer of nutritional yeast onto pizza just after it leaves the oven. Cheese is hard to digest, especially when cooked, but that doesn’t mean you have to cede the taste completely. If you top a pizza with diverse textures and flavors, such as a robust marinara sauce, roasted vegetables and nutritional yeast, the cheese component is unnecessary.

Bread Crumbs

Replace bread crumbs with nutritional yeast in any mixture requiring holding power. This cuts down on the carbs and adds an extra bite. Try using nutritional yeast to hold together veggie burgers or any other patty that would normally require bread crumbs.

Roasted Vegetables

One of my favorite go-to meals is roasted vegetables topped with shredded cheese. On days I’d like to skip the cheese and opt for a healthier alternative, I stir nutritional yeast into the finished vegetables instead. When warmed by the vegetables, the yeast smoothens out and creates a creamy sauce with help from the vegetable juices and oils.

Roasted Nuts

Roast nuts that have been tossed in some nutritional yeast. The roasted flavor will be augmented and the nuts will have a slightly cheesy coating on the skin.

Dog Food

Dogs need their vitamin B12 too, especially if your dog is on a plant-based diet. Mix some nutritional yeast in your furry friend’s nibbles and he or she will benefit in a major way.

 Read the rest and check out recipe suggestions at EcoSalon.

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4 Responses to “Nutritional Yeast: What it is & What to do with it. ~ Aylin Erman”

  1. Abby says:

    Thank you for this! I just made a vegan spinach artichoke dip using tofu and nutritional yeast. . . no one could tell it wasn't made with dairy! Now I know what else I can do with the yeast flakes.

  2. michellec433 says:

    I will be making Onion Rings with nutrition yeast from now on. This is awesome!!!

  3. jackiecheese says:

    i was out at a bar friday night talking some poor, stranger's ear off about how i put nutritional yeast on everything. i was also telling them how i could tell that it affected my mood because it's pretty much straight vitamin b. i'm sure they were juuuust fascinated.

  4. tina says:

    HI! I came to this site to read the MSG article and saw this article. I have a MSG allergy and yeast is a no, but was wondering if this nutritional yeast would be fine to eat?

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