Oh, Buddhist folk don’t give a shit if you’re Buddhist.

Via on Jun 2, 2014

trungpa dharma art buddhism

Buddhism: the “Disorganized Religion.”

Buddhism is the Honey Badger of World Religions, & Genuine Creativity is Inexhaustible.

A friend asked me about writing. This question of burn out, writer’s block, creativity vs. genuine expression…comes up a lot for me, as an editor of a, you know, huge publication.

Also, the question of Buddhism being a religion or a philosophy, a way of life, comes up a lot. It’s neither. It’s a non-theistic religion.

honey badger video

Friend: Do you ever feel exhausted by creativity?

Like it’s a relentless slave driver

Nope

I do feel exhausted by meetings, though.

There’s a book I want to give to you/show you about this.

 

Maya Angelou: ““You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.”

 

Okay, well why don’t you come and write all that graces my brain and I will put on short shorts, a drawl and go to your meetings?

Works for me. Just tuck your lovely long hair up into one of my trucker hats, pull it low.

“Dharma art provides a vehicle to appreciate the nature of things as they are and express it without any struggle or desire to achieve. A work of dharma art brings out the goodness and dignity of the situation it reflects—dignity that comes from the artist’s interest in the details of life and sense of appreciation for experience. Trungpa shows how the principles of dharma art extend to everyday life: any activity can provide an opportunity to relax and open our senses to the phenomenal world.

Looks like there’s a new edition, called “True Perception.”

The first edition, which I have, is called “Dharma Art.”

Beautiful… but can I be honest for a moment? I have a huge religion wall. Whenever someone sends me anything religious, in any which way or form I have to work with all my might to climb over my walls and look at it from a distance. I’d like to hear about Dharma from you and your mouth…maybe it would change.

Oh, Buddhist folk don’t give a shit if you’re Buddhist.

I call it a “disorganized religion”

There’s no god, it’s non-theistic

No one wants your credit card or to dress you in a white turban.

It’s really just about being present (meditation practice), and being of benefit (compassion) with a lot of humor (Vajrayana) and direct powerful insight.

I don’t give a shit if you’re Buddhist. Buddhism isn’t really about Buddhism, anyways, it’s about what I mentioned above.

I meditated today. for a moment.

I sat in the sunshine on a rock [at the] creek point today and shut my eyes and listened to the ocean hitting the rocks and my breath. It only last all of five minutes, but I tried.

Yes, just pausing. Appreciating. I think you probably do that all the time, more than you think. When you fail to fill the space out of nervous speedy fear, that’s meditation.

Okay—you got it. Hit me with your Dharma.

The Dalai Lama, leader of Tibetan Buddhism, says that if Buddhism conflicts with science, we go with science. Buddhism is the Honey Badger of World Religions.

Yeah–so Dharma Art isn’t about converting you to anything. It’s about how to make art an expression of your fearless truth, the present moment, instead of a display of ego.

You got the Honey Badger reference? Honey Badger don’t give a shit.

I like how you explained that. I love that….I do now.

 

~

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Comments

3 Responses to “Oh, Buddhist folk don’t give a shit if you’re Buddhist.”

  1. Padma Kadag says:

    Not sure if HH Dalai Lama said the quote, " if Buddhism conflicts with science, we go with science". In any case,
    It's interesting to me why this is quoted so often quoted here and other blogs as well. Does the quote serve as a means to demonstrate Buddhist open-ness? Does it want to align Buddhism with science because as we are all supposed to know that science is a "fact"? Beyond fallacy? Or does it mean that there is no need for Buddhism because we have science to answer all of our questions? If the Dalai Lama said this what do you think he meant? What do Buddhists want to convey by quoting it frequently? Does it simply mean that if there is something about Buddhism we as an individual practitioner do not understand then rely on science or common sense? I think, that maybe, HH means to say that science, all of science, as well as all phenomena resides in Buddhist view as does anything and everything.

  2. Crystal says:

    Hi Padma,
    I've heard this quote by the Dalai Lama as well and I take it to mean that it's important to be open to things in order to seek the "truth" rather than holding tightly to fixed ideas and concepts, or to follow something blindly without question. The Dalai Lama is very interested in science and enjoys studying it, from what I've read. I don't think that science is without fault and theories can be wrong at times, but I feel like the point is to be open to ideas and not push things away just because they don't fit with our ideas. They can be fluid instead.

    It sort of reminds me of something Pema Chodron said at one of her teachings- to sum it up, she said whenever we think we have things completely figured out and know 100% for sure that we know everything about life and why we're here, about what happens when we die, etc., then that's probably not it, because we can't know 100% for sure. She meant to stay open to learning and growing and to question everything the way a scientist would rather than taking Buddhism or any other religion, philosophy, etc. to be the "ultimate truth."

    Have a great day!

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