Exploited Workers in Labor Camps build Dubai. [slideshow]

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‘We need slaves to build monuments.’

Via Caroline Clark.

Dubai, a populous city of United Arab Emirates, is synonymous with excess. Home to the world’s largest indoor ski resort, and currently finishing  the world’s highest sky-scraper, the city possesses remarkable wealth—and a promise of high returns for foreign investors.
 
The vastly rich, glitzy metropolis seems to have appeared overnight. But how? Ghaith Adbul-Ahad captures the plight of the destitute laborers behind Dubai’s fortune.


Click here for the Labor Camp Slideshow.

We need slaves to build monuments,’ by Ghaith Abdul-Ahan

The sun is setting and its dying rays cast triangles of light on to the bodies of the Indian workers. Two are washing themselves, scooping water from tubs in a small yard next to the labour camp’s toilets. Others queue for their turn. One man stands stamping his feet in a bucket, turned into a human washing machine. The heat is suffocating and the sandy wind whips our faces. The sprinkles of water from men drying their clothes fall like welcome summer rain.

All around, a city of labour camps stretches out in the middle of the Arabian desert, a jumble of low, concrete barracks, corrugated iron, chicken-mesh walls, barbed wire, scrap metal, empty paint cans, rusted machinery and thousands of men with tired and gloomy faces.

I have left Dubai’s spiralling towers, man-made islands and mega-malls behind and driven through the desert to the outskirts of the neighbouring city of Abu Dhabi. Turn right before the Zaha Hadid bridge, and a few hundred metres takes you to the heart of Mousafah, a ghetto-like neighbourhood of camps hidden away from the eyes of tourists. It is just one of many areas around the Gulf set aside for an army of labourers building the icons of architecture that are mushrooming all over the region.

Behind the showers, in a yard paved with metal sheets, a line of men stands silently in front of grease-blackened pans, preparing their dinner. Sweat rolls down their heads and necks, their soaked shirts stuck to their backs. A heavy smell of spices and body odour fills the air.

Next to a heap of rubbish, a man holds a plate containing his meal: a few chillies, an onion and three tomatoes, to be fried with spices and eaten with a piece of bread.

In a neighbouring camp, a group of Pakistani workers from north and south Waziristan sit exhaustedly sipping tea while one of them cooks outside. In the middle of the cramped room in which 10 men sleep, one worker in a filthy robe sits on the floor grinding garlic and onions with a mortar and pestle while staring into the void.

Hamidullah, a thin Afghan from Maydan, a village on the outskirts of Kabul, tells me: “I spent five years in Iran and one year here, and one year here feels like 10 years. When I left Afghanistan I thought I would be back in a few months, but now I don’t know when I will be back.” Another worker on a bunk bed next to him adds: “He called his home yesterday and they told him that three people from his village were killed in fighting. This is why we are here.”

Hamidullah earns around 450 dirhams (£70) a month as a construction worker.

How is life, I ask.

“What life? We have no life here. We are prisoners. We wake up at five, arrive to work at seven and are back at the camp at nine in the evening, day in and day out.”

Outside in the yard, another man sits on a chair made of salvaged wood, in front of a broken mirror, a plastic sheet wrapped around his neck, while the camp barber trims his thick beard. Despite the air of misery, tonight is a night of celebration…

Click here for the full article. 

 

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anonymous Apr 27, 2012 3:34pm

[…] Usually in these places you’ll find groups of foreign laborers, Pakistanis and Indians mostly, playing cricket or simply loitering about the freeway. We are never quite sure what they’re up to, but you’re liable to run across one of these guys almost anywhere in the country—even out in the middle of the desert. They’ve left their wives and children behind and sleep eight to a room in labor camps. […]

anonymous Sep 6, 2011 9:37am

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anonymous Apr 2, 2011 12:16pm

[…] can bounce back faster than building a modern city in the Arabian Desert using poorly paid foreign workers, exploiting their poverty to enrich the super-wealthy Arabs; again another glowing example of the […]

anonymous Oct 20, 2009 1:26pm

I live in Dubai. On friday, I like to see all these workers having rest on the jumeirah beautiful public beach and gardens.
This beautiful beach will not exist or be free in Western countries. We have all suffered from descrimination in Paris and live in 6 square meters with water and toilets in the hall , we were queuing sometimes, that's in the most beautiful city of the world and city of human rights,and above all we suffer cold and rain waiting the bus without any shelter.
Thanks god, averything has been done to avoid heat here in Dubai, every place is with AC even the bus station. Now the bus suttles for the metro are air conditionned and free, yes free for everyone
When 5 workers needed for one task in Dubai, the westerners employ just one for the same task and squeeze him to death. My brother was fired from his job because he set up a fire in an open space where he worked to warm himself ( the temprerature was -10°C) He was alone to work for all the plant ( electricity installation ) windows were not fixed yet.
I respect all the workers and talked with them in Dubai.

MM

anonymous Apr 13, 2009 4:24pm

sad …………the greed of the western world is endless………i will certainly not spend my money in a place like dubai ….
no interest at all in a place like that anyway , they start to feel the pinch a few banks got cash flow problems and without abudhabi they ll be bankrupt …………