What your Favorite City’s Night Sky would look like without any Light Pollution.

Via elephant journal
on Dec 25, 2013
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calvin hobbes light pollution heavens stars

Cities and their Stars (without light pollution)

What do we lose, as human beings, by way of perspective on our own lives and troubles and triumphs…when we lose the Heavens?

I’m visiting Shambhala Mountain Center high up in the Rocky Mountains. It’s night–and I can see a million thousand stars and the Milky Way, for the first time in forever.

What if your city turned its lights off at night? What if we had our Heavens above returned to us? Here’s what 14 famous cities’ night skies would look like.

What is light pollution? Why does it matter? Here’s a graph.

Bonus: 9 Quotes about The Universe.

14 Photos of Cities with their God-Nature-given, now-vanished starscapes:

PARIS.

“Cohen photographs the world’s major cities, seeking out views that resonate for him and noting the precise time, angle, and latitude and longitude of his exposure.”

RIO:

“As the world rotates around its axis the stars that would have been visible above a particular city move to deserts, plains, and other places free of light pollution.”

San Francisco.

“By noting the precise latitude and angle of his cityscape, Cohen is able to track the earth’s rotation to places of atmospheric clarity like the Mojave, the Sahara, and the Atacama desert.”

New York City.

“There he sets up his camera to record what is lost to modern urban dwellers.Compositing the two images, Cohen creates a single new image full of resonance and nuance.”

LOS ANGELES.

“The work is both political and spiritual questioning not only what we are doing to the planet but drawing unexpected connections between disparate locations.”

São Paulo.

“Equally importantly it asks: what do we miss by obscuring the visibility of stars? As the world’s population becomes increasingly urban, there is a disjunction with the natural world which both Cohen and science posit causes both physical and psychological harm.”

Shanghai.

“Cities that never sleep are made up of millions of individuals breaking natural cycles of work and repose. Cohen’s photographs attempt to restore our vision, and in beautifully crafted prints and images offer the viewer a possibility – to re-connect us to the infinite energy of the stars.”

“Equally importantly it asks: what do we miss by obscuring the visibility of stars? As the world’s population becomes increasingly urban, there is a disjunction with the natural world which both Cohen and science posit causes both physical and psychological harm.”

The Brooklyn Bridge, New York City.

“Cities that never sleep are made up of millions of individuals breaking natural cycles of work and repose. Cohen’s photographs attempt to restore our vision, and in beautifully crafted prints and images offer the viewer a possibility – to re-connect us to the infinite energy of the stars.”

Hong Kong

More images here. 16 in total.

Relephant Reads:

Light Pollution: do we Look at the Heavens, anymore?

We Are All the Dust of Stars. ~ Dejah Beauchamp

We are Star Stuff. We are Love, Peace, Joy.

Supermoon! It’s a Marvelous Night for a Moon Dance.

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Comments

3 Responses to “What your Favorite City’s Night Sky would look like without any Light Pollution.”

  1. kindreddish says:

    Thanks for this! I just love it! I have seen 3 starry nights in my life that completely blew me out of the water. In Australia… in Costa Rica and in the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador. It's hard to have any stress or qualms when you lie there looking up at the universe above you!

  2. kosokun says:

    Brilliant!

  3. Jacinta says:

    Very cool images 🙂 interesting thoughts… I painted a mountain scene at night, with the aurora borealis coming over the mountain peak, and the last part to paint were the stars. Well, after I splashed on the stars, I wasn’t sure if I liked it. The painting sat on the easel in my living room for the longest time, because I thought I might have overdone the amount of stars in the sky. Finally, one day I mixed some paint and brushed away that starry sky. I haven’t yet re painted the stars back, and now this article has made me realise, my first attempt was truly what the sky might look like, but living in the city, I’m so used to an almost starless sky. So OMG ~ like I’m gonna paint my sky full of stars again ~

  4. Linda V. Lewis says:

    The vastness and light of the the heavens at night put humans in our place–we are so tiny! This is wonderfully humbling! We should not forget this perspective!
    Also, seeing the moon at night without the competition of city nights is magical. Moonlight and moon-shadows make the world sparkle and the heart fill with appreciation.