0.5
February 7, 2014

What Our Bodies Are For. ~ Kristin Morris

Photo: Raine Hilton

A woman’s body is for her, first and foremost.

To support her, and to support her doings.

The appearance of it can be for subjective opinion, if the opinion holder realizes their opinion is subjective.

But that’s the toe of the body’s iceberg, it is an object.

It’s an object for her to navigate with.

For her to judge her habits and environments by how it responds to them.

For her to convey the feelings and thoughts inside it to those outside that provoked them.

When she wants to, and when she’s not aware of it,

her body will convey what she resists conveying, as it’s there to serve her underlying best interest.

It’s for her to touch, and for her to feel and enjoy that touch.

It can be for her to stencil and drape on.

To display art, instruction, a memory, or a hope.

The body she has, it’s for her utility for her to forget about, and focus on other important issues while it runs on its own.

And, may I say—for her to always have something to be grateful for, or interact with.

As those are two imperative needs of the non-physical part of a person.

It connects her to the people she came from and to the repeating examples of that process across countless times and places.

So she’s related to something anywhere she goes.

It is for her to share as the platform for a visual, a service, or an experience.

And then others, or another, can appreciate it and her choice to share it.

Though the body benefits her, in this, the sharing is meant to benefit them.

“Them” doesn’t reference the receiver, it references the new unit of both, or all.

A man’s body is for him, first and foremost.

To support him, and to support his doings.

The appearance is the toe of the body’s iceberg.

It is an object; it’s an object for him to navigate with.

For him to judge his habits and environments by its responses.

For him to convey the feelings and thoughts inside it to those outside that provoked them.

When he wants to, and when he’s not aware of it, his body will also convey what he resists conveying, because your body is there to serve your best interest, for as long as you respect it.

It’s for him to touch, and for him to feel and enjoy that touch.

It can be for him to stencil and drape on.

To display art, instruction, a memory, or a hope.

The body he has, it’s for his utility for him to forget about to focus on other important issues while it runs on its own.

And may I say, for him to always have something to be grateful for or interact with.

As those are two imperative needs of the non-physical part of a person.

It connects him to the people he came from, and to the repeating examples of that process across countless times and places.

So he’s related to something anywhere he goes.

It is for him to share

as the platform for a visual, a service, and an experience.

And then others, or another, can appreciate it and his choice to share it.

Though the body is to benefit him, in this, the sharing is to benefit them.

“Them” references the new unit of both, or all.

The body is an object

Because it is not the definitive essence of any person.

You don’t have a person just by having a body.

It is for a type of objectification.

But by the person that operates it, it is his, or her, means to an end.

An end of a desire or a pursuit.

Which might start the outer acknowledgment or appreciation from others.

But that is not what I want your body, or my body, or any body to be sent out for, first and foremost.

Because first and foremost, your body is for you.

My body is for me.

And if they happen to intersect, I am all the more grateful knowing what I have just said, because the interaction is not an entitlement, and the body isn’t something I am deemed able to control or critique.

It is either a coincidence or a gift which I’ll enthusiastically appreciate.

Because your body is for you.

And even more, I appreciate

That my body is

for me,

First and foremost.

Love elephant and want to go steady?

Sign up for our (curated) daily and weekly newsletters!

Assistant Editor: Gabbi Magana/Bryonie Wise

Photo: Raine Hilton

Leave a Thoughtful Comment
X

Read 0 comments and reply

Top Contributors Latest

Kristin Morris