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December 14, 2009

A Day in the Life of Congressman. ~ A Photo Story

Recently, I spent a day with Connecticut’s newest member of Congress, Rep. Jim Himes (D-CT-4th), shooting a photo story for the Norwalk Hour.

Nov. 19, 2009-Rep. Jim Himes (D-CT) prepares for a House Financial Services Committee vote on his amendment to H.R. 3996, Financial Stability Improvement Act of 2009. The Himes Amendment would allow companies like GE Capital, which employs 7,000 workers in Connecticut, to continue financing their customers. For example, the amendment would help hospitals purchase MRIs made by GE’s industrial parent. The Committee, chaired by Barney Frank (D-MA), voted to pass the amendment. Although Rep. Himes is a freshman member of Congress, his experience in finance and the affordable housing give him the background to serve on the influential House Committee on Financial Services.

Nov. 19, 2009-Rep. Jim Himes (D-CT) prepares for a House Financial Services Committee vote on his amendment to H.R. 3996, Financial Stability Improvement Act of 2009. The Himes Amendment would allow companies like GE Capital, which employs 7,000 workers in Connecticut, to continue financing their customers. For example, the amendment would help hospitals purchase MRIs made by GE’s industrial parent. The Committee, chaired by Barney Frank (D-MA), voted to pass the amendment. Although Rep. Himes is a freshman member of Congress, his experience in finance and the affordable housing give him the background to serve on the influential House Committee on Financial Services.

Nov. 19, 2009-Munire Jawed of Wilton, Conn., seeks advice from Rep. Himes about Rhodes Scholarship application process. “Never underestimate the power of making a personal connection,” Himes said as the two chatted in the Capitol’s Rayburn Room. After graduating from Harvard, Himes became a Rhodes Scholar and specialized in Latin American studies, particularly El Salvador, at Oxford University. Born in Lima, Peru to American parents, Himes is fluent in both English and Spanish. After his parents divorced, he moved to the U.S. with his mother and sister.

Nov. 19, 2009-Rep. Himes checks his computer after a Homeland Security hearing on domestic terrorism threats.

Nov. 19, 2009- “Jim Himes is very tall and walks very fast,” said his press secretary Elizabeth Kerr. And it’s true, Rep. Himes covers a lot of ground, quickly. When asked about his speediness, Rep. Himes said, “There’s not enough time in the world.” According to Himes, one day he wore a pedometer to work and clocked six miles. “And that was a slow day,” he said. Between hearings, votes and meetings, the Congressman’s day is so packed it’s tough to find time for a bite to eat, not to mention time to relax. But he still manages to hit the gym first thing in the morning and enjoys a glass of wine when he has time. When asked what he does to relax Congressman Himes said, “Two things on opposite ends of the medical spectrum, exercise and drinking a glass of wine.” He also enjoys staying up late reading legislation and spending time with his family.

Nov. 19, 2009-The first term Congressman meets with Michael Calhoun, president of the Center for Responsible Lending, Lisa Ranson, vice president of federal policy for CRL, and CRL consultant Paul Sweet. Chief of Staff Jason Cole is pictured in the foreground, left. The Center for Responsible Lending is a nonpartisan research group advocating to stop predatory lending.

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ccdemuth Jun 8, 2010 8:24pm

With an upcoming election, Jim Himes is cross dressing as a fiscal moderate, but his act is not particularly convincing. He is “just at a point where I don’t want to see any more unpaid spending”. To be clear, that point runs from now until election day. If he can only fool the voters back home long enough, then he will revert to form – punishing success, subsidizing failure, and crushing our economic future under a load of his wasteful spending. He is without peer as an enemy of the taxpayer and friend of big government and government’s cronies; however, both Pelosi and Himes know that he has to put on a bit of an act for a few remaining month before he can again run out-of-control.

ccdemuth May 19, 2010 3:58pm

Himes’ $115 Billion Mistake

Himes’ healthcare takeover already has massive cost overruns compared to its advertized costs. Himes voted for a bill that was supposed to cost only $788 billion. Since March, the estimate has been increased by $115-125 billion, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

Only in Washington does one encounter the phrase “only $788 billion”. Only with followers such as Himes can Nancy Pelosi pass laws first and admit to the costs later. Only if the voters return Himes to Washington will we get more of the same fraudulent accounting of the costs of his votes, wasteful spending, and abuse of the taxpayer.

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Caroline Treadway

Caroline Treadway is a professional freelance photographer and writer who shoots editorial and commercial work, including photojournalism, sports, portraits and weddings. She received her master’s degree in journalism from Boston University in 2010. Caroline’s passion for journalism is evident in the variety of stories she covers and the depth of her reporting, documenting the unique and powerful moments of life. Recently, Caroline has been documenting the life of Navajo geo-botanist Arnold Clifford and threats to rare plant species in the Four Corners region of the Navajo Reservation in New Mexico and Arizona. As a journalist, Caroline seeks to overcome the traditional boundaries between photographer and reporter. This multi-platform approach gives her the flexibility to create visual stories for a rapidly changing media world.