How Building A Tiny House Helped Heal a Heart.

Via Jennifer S. White
on Dec 28, 2013
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Well, this is one of the coolest stories I’ve ever read.

Architect Macy Miller from Idaho built her dream home with her own two hands, at a cost of only $11,000—and that house is less than 200 square feet.

Even better?

She did so after going through a divorce and losing her home to foreclosure.

Talk about making lemonade from lemons.

The following excerpts are from an NPR interview with Miller. Listen to the full interview at NPR’s Tell Me More website.

Interview Highlights:

 “On building the home”

It took 18 months. I had a minor injury—or some might call it a major injury. Yeah, I did break my back. I’m a klutz and I fell off the roof, and it was because I was being incredibly stupid.

On the home she used to live in:

I came from a 2,500-square-foot house. You know, four bedrooms, three baths and, you know, I had bedrooms that I literally never even opened. After years, there were still vacuum marks on the floor. It was a little bit too much. It was not really my style at all, and this just works better for me personally.”

On the most expensive and difficult part of building the house:

The most expensive component in the house is my toilet, actually. I didn’t want to put in a sewer line, so I have a composting toilet. And so to put that through all the tests it needs to go through to be regulated and OK’d by jurisdictions, it brings up the price tag on it quite a bit. So that was my most expensive part.

The hardest and probably most daunting part for me was all of my electrical, because I had no experience with electrical whatsoever. I never had any building experience, either. I went to school for design, which is a lot different than building. So wiring the house was scary to me, because if I did something wrong, I could shock myself and hurt myself, or, you know, light it on fire. But … I just got a book, I read about it, watched YouTube videos. I did it, and then I came and I had a licensed electrician check my work before I covered anything up. So I was happy to find out I did everything just right. It took me a couple times in some spots, but I got it.

On how it feels to live in a tiny home:

My house, honestly, it doesn’t feel that tiny. The space is laid out in a way that I have a living room, I have a bedroom, I have a kitchen, I have a bathroom. They all function; none of them feels cramped. I mean, two people can cook in my kitchen at the same time. I actually also have a Great Dane that runs around in there. I designed it for him, though, too. I have stairs up to the bedroom. So, like, a lot of people that live in tiny houses have loft spaces, but I wanted him to be able to get up into the bed, and that’s where he spends most of his time, honestly.

On whether other people can live in tiny homes, too:

There’s a whole bunch of people all across the nation right now. It’s kind of a do-it-yourself kind of movement, because they kind of get pricey if you have to pay someone else to do them, and, you know, it costs the same as a normal house. So if it costs the same, why would you not just build a normal house? There’s people doing this all over. I would say look into it more, research it, and see if it’s right for you. It’s more of a change in the style of living, and there is quite a bit of going against the norm. You get a lot of naysayers that [say] it’s not possible and you can’t do it, and you just have to believe in yourself more than that, because it’s really not that different.”

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Editor: Bryonie Wise

 

 

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About Jennifer S. White

Jennifer S. White is a voracious reader, obsessive writer, passionate yoga instructor and drinker of hoppy ales. She’s also a devoted mama and wife (a stay-at-home yogi). She considers herself to be one of the funniest people who ever lived and she’s also an identical twin. In addition to her work on elephant journal, Jennifer has over 40 articles published on the wellness website MindBodyGreen and her yoga-themed column Your Personal Yogi ran in the newspaper Toledo Free Press. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in geology, absolutely no degrees in anything related to literature, and she currently owns a wheel of cheese. If you want to learn more about Jennifer, make sure to check out her writing, as she’s finally put her tendencies to over-think and over-share to good use. Jennifer is the author of The Best Day of Your Life, available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. She’s also as excited as a five year old to announce the release of her second book, The Art of Parenting: Love Letters from a Mother, available on Amazon.

Comments

3 Responses to “How Building A Tiny House Helped Heal a Heart.”

  1. This article is best in my personal opinion. The details are offered with intelligent thought and also consideration. It is rather very nicely written and intriguing. Thank you for delivering this kind of useful information.

  2. hoppy says:

    i love the idea! do you have the plans drawn up for sale? I would love to build one of these next summer ! ! !

  3. Well done Macy Miller, very inspirational, especially with what she had gone through

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