Green Gifts: Tote your Whole Paycheck to Whole Foods. [lol]

Via on Aug 10, 2008


Well, maybe it ain’t quite laugh-out-loud [lol], but it’s close. Tote this er…tote to Whole Foods, and count the funny expressions and icebreakin’ conversations you inspire. Thing is, I think WFM is actually worth it—or at least organics/fair-trade are, generally. As a former board member of the now-defunct truly-local little Boulder Co-op, it’s only when the good folks at WFM place conventional produce below signs touting the importance of ‘LOCAL’ that I get irked. Overall, as an eco-minded consumer, I give credit where credit is due: WFM showed America (and Wall St.) that doing well could be good business—and it’s made 100s of small local eco companies available to the hungry green masses.

Bottom line: it’s old news by now, but actually using this bag, or one like it, is the best answer to that classic koan: “Paper or plastic?” Get it? Got it. 

Still an ecobachelor, don’t know how to cook, therefore aren’t buying much more than Ben & Jerry’s and chips and veggie chili? Get this. Got it? 

About Waylon Lewis

Waylon Lewis, founder of elephant magazine, now elephantjournal.com & host of Walk the Talk Show with Waylon Lewis, is a 1st generation American Buddhist “Dharma Brat." Voted #1 in U.S. on twitter for #green two years running, Changemaker & Eco Ambassador by Treehugger, Green Hero by Discovery’s Planet Green, Best (!) Shameless Self-Promoter at Westword's Web Awards, Prominent Buddhist by Shambhala Sun, & 100 Most Influential People in Health & Fitness 2011 by "Greatist", Waylon is a mediocre climber, lazy yogi, 365-day bicycle commuter & best friend to Redford (his rescue hound). His aim: to bring the good news re: "the mindful life" beyond the choir & to all those who didn't know they gave a care. elephantjournal.com | facebook.com/elephantjournal | twitter.com/elephantjournal | facebook.com/waylonhlewis | twitter.com/waylonlewis | Google+ For more: publisherelephantjournalcom

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10 Responses to “Green Gifts: Tote your Whole Paycheck to Whole Foods. [lol]”

  1. Lindsey Wolf lindsey says:

    I’ve had some interesting experiences with “Whole Paycheck.” I’ve worked as a cashier at Whole Foods, and it used to drive my crazy when customers would complain to me about their bill. (Internally at the store, we preferred to call where we worked “The Food Hole” much more clever we had thought). Five years and several jobs later, I found myself with a small group, hearing John Mackey speak, and at the end he was addressed this question of the Whole Paycheck reputation. His response involved disposable income. He said that Americans today spend close to 10% of their disposable incomes on food, whereas it used to be much higher (close to 25% I believe in the 1930′s and over 50% 100 years ago). And today in looking at countries worldwide, he mentioned Japan, where they spend close to 15% of their disposable incomes on food. His point was that it’s about what you value. I think what they are doing as a whole is largely positive, but that there are still too few people in America that can make a choice here. I’m still thankful for when I can afford to buy an organic, fair trade product.

    • dan says:

      I found myself with a small group, hearing John Mackey speak, and at the end he was addressed this question of the Whole Paycheck reputation. His response involved disposable income. He said that Americans today spend close to 10% of their disposable incomes on food, whereas it used to be much higher (close to 25% I believe in the 1930's and over 50% 100 years ago). And today in looking at countries worldwide, he mentioned Japan, where they spend close to 15% of their disposable incomes on food"

      nice rationalization to some groupies such as yourself for elitist profiteering from a man who thinks nothing of unethical methods of driving out the competiotion (ie wild oats scandal ) to help establish a semi monopoly situation BTW genuis .. Japan is basically an island and food prices are notoriously high.. nice comparison this logic reminds me of those who claim you should spend more on a bed (namely bed salesman) than a car as you spend more time in it..what a BS artist..oh yeah i forgot if you dont buy whole foods youll also get cancer..your own fault so no health ins options for you!

    • Maile says:

      I don't have a problem paying more for the good stuff, but I find it strange that I can find most, if not all of it, at lower cost in smaller markets and co-ops.

      What's up with that, John Mackey?

  2. [...] to love the earth, and keep chemicals out of your tummy—but can’t afford to spend your whole paycheck at Whole Foods? That’s the pitch that the new Sunflower Farmers Markets grocery chain is [...]

  3. dan says:

    I found myself with a small group, hearing John Mackey speak, and at the end he was addressed this question of the Whole Paycheck reputation. His response involved disposable income. He said that Americans today spend close to 10% of their disposable incomes on food, whereas it used to be much higher (close to 25% I believe in the 1930's and over 50% 100 years ago). And today in looking at countries worldwide, he mentioned Japan, where they spend close to 15% of their disposable incomes on food"

    nice rationalization to some groupies such as yourself for elitist profiteering from a man who thinks nothing of unethical methods of driving out the competiotion (ie wild oats scandal ) to help establish a semi monopoly situation BTW genuis .. Japan is basically an island and food prices are notoriously high.. nice comparison this logic reminds me of those who claim you should spend more on a bed (namely bed salesman) than a car as you spend more time in it..what a BS artist..oh yeah i forgot if you dont buy whole foods youll also get cancer..your own fault so no health ins options for you!

  4. [...] Whole Paycheck by some, I’d remind we conscious consumers that if the food is more local and more organic [...]

  5. Cliff says:

    No, it's not really funny to me.

    Years ago my partner and I agreed we would make living green and organic a priority, that it would be one of our investments.

    I am grateful there are numerous places I can go (including my local Whole Foods Market) to purchase certified organic food. For local I can head out to the North Union Farmers Markets that happen at a number of locations on various days throughout the week.

  6. Randall Smith says:

    I shop local for as much as I can. Whole Foods pretty much supplies the rest, i.e. USA OG fruit n veg and OG bulk thru the winter and spring until the farmers have stuff to offer at market. What I find expensive are processed foods and supplements. I don't have a co. health ins. policy so what I do to and put in my body is essentially my health insurance. I'd have to put Partial Paycheck on my tote and hat.

    • Randall Smith says:

      and, as I experienced last night, make sure your cashier is entering your bulk items correctly. I saved $20 at the register after paying for "cut flowers" disguised as less than a pound of organic oatmeal.

  7. warriorsaint says:

    Shortly before leaving Colorado I dicovered Sunflower Market in Denver. MUCH better prices than WFM-and the same products. Hmm….maybe Whole Foods is the WalMart of the healthy food set?

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