New Year’s Eve: fun traditions around the world.

Via on Dec 30, 2008

How are you choosing to have fun this New Year’s Eve?

Tradition has kept community awareness alive, don’t you think? Observe what is that you repeat every end of the year to symbolize the end of the old and the beginning of the new. Regardless on when the calendar of your choice marks the New Year (Calendars almost always were design to honor the change of the seasons and celebrate the harvest ~ ofcourse Julio Cesar ~ who order the gregorian calendar ~ was thinking of himself so He added August in honor of his second name, Augusto, and created the leap year to make the adjustments necessary ~ which you can obviously notice in the “out of synch with natural cycles” time we follow through this worldly calendar ~ anyway, that is another article you can count on reading soon).

So, New Year’s Eve tradition…

Spain: Invite some friends for a late dinner. In Spain, that’s 9 p.m. at the earliest! Before midnight, bring out the dessert — bunches of grapes. Eat one grape with each toll of the midnight bells. This old tradition is thought to bring good luck.

Mexico: Like in Spain, we cook, we eat, we drink and celebrate eating one grape with each toll of the midnight bells. And adding to the good luck, we wear new red underwear, broom out of the house any negativity, throw a glass of water out so no tears are shed in the new year and go out running like crazy (Because all this has to be done in the first minute of the new year!) in the street with a suitcase in your hand so you travel the new year! I LOVE IT.

Colombia: In Colombia  South America, it’s a tradition to make a dummy representing the Año Viejo (the old year). It’s made out of bits of old clothing from each family member and stuffed with straw and firecrackers. On a piece of paper, every family member writes a fault or a bit of bad luck that they want to get rid of. Exactly at midnight, Año Viejo is set on fire and burns until nothing but ashes is left. That’s when all of the old year’s bad luck and faults disappear.

Greece: It’s a Greek tradition to serve Vasilopita (New Year’s Bread) at midnight. Vasilopita bread is baked with a coin or charm hidden inside. The head of the household cuts the bread exactly at midnight and whoever receives the piece with the coin will have good fortune throughout the year.

Unite States: Make a Party! Dance, drink, eat and then KISS somebody at midnight while confetti and celebration sounds excite everyone and fireworks are lightening the sky! The Ball in New York City  falls from the top of Times Square on New Year’s Eve, it starts to drop from with about thirty seconds to go in the old year. The significance and the meaning of the ball dropping on New Year’s Eve is that this event signals the end of one year and the beginning of another year.

France: New Year’s Eve in France is usually celebrated with a feast called Le Reveillon de la Saint-Sylvestre, with foie gras and champagne. The New Year’s festivities end on January 6th. On that day, people enjoy a variety of cakes depending on what region of France they live in. The significance of this New Year’s tradition is to have a very full and fruitful year.

Japan: In Japan it is a New Year’s tradition for everyone to clean their homes in order to clean out the old year and to welcome in the new year. In addition, there is a singing competition that takes place in Japan called Red and White Year end Song Festival. Music is the gateway to new awareness!

The Netherlands: New Year’s traditions in the Netherlands involve family and traditional food.  Plus, there is a performance of one of the Dutch cabarets on TV which is combination of stand up comedy and political satire.

Australia:  One of the New Year’s traditions all over Australia involves huge fireworks displays. Usually over water :) Also, there is always a New Year’s poker game in Melbourne, and the loser of the game gets a pie in their face. The meaning of their New Year’s traditions involves having fun and joking all year round.

Venezuela: The New Year’s traditions in Venezuela involve getting good luck in the New Year. For love, they must wear yellow underwear on New Year’s Eve and those people who want money must carry a large bill in their wallet when they toast at midnight.

It does not matter, where you are from or where in the world you will be celebrating, Choose your tradition with awareness of your intention and use the power of the manifesting thought. May you be celebrating life on Earth together with family, friends; make your celebration a prayer for Peace and Love for all!

HAPPY NEW YEAR’S EVE!

love

yeye

P>S> ADD YOUR TRADITION in YOUR COMMENTS!

About Yesica Pineda

My name is Yésica Pineda-Moreno, though some people call me Yeye. I was born and raised in Mexico City. My mom and dad are wonderful people who raised me to believe that loving-kindness, peace of body, mind and soul ~ real happiness ~ are the only worthwhile goals in life, the rest is just history. At the age of 20, I was chosen a Mexican Musical Talent (Valores Juveniles = American Idol) between thousands of young people in the country. Such opportunity gave me the chance to travel to The United States and meet incredible famous people from whom I've learned plenty about the hard work involved in the public life and the challenges it represents to our spiritual growth. I recorded my solo album with 10 time’s Grammy winner engineer Rafa Sardina rafasardina.com, and the talented songwriter Rafa Esparza-Ruiz. You can find it in any digital store by searching "Yeye Organic Pop". When I thought there was nothing else to be achieved, I found Yoga, or Yoga found me. In 2000, I started training with Bryan Kest and educated myself in his school of Power Yoga, which eventually led me to the practice of Vipassana meditation with teacher S.N.Goenka dhamma.org, training which I consider my foundation. For more information about my Yoga Practice visit yogichocolate.com My current music project is called Planetary Moods ~ Pop Sanskrit and the exploration of different frequencies resonance. You can hear my music on on myspace Listen at our website Planetary Moods.

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One Response to “New Year’s Eve: fun traditions around the world.”

  1. Paula G says:

    Hey Yessica,
    we do the red underwear in Spain as well! And the suitcase, and something made of gold in your glass of champaign (that you drink right after taking the grapes). Then you party until sunrise and have "chocolate con churros" before going home :)
    Loved this post, un abrazo desde España

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