21 Things you’re Not recycling.

Via on Jan 18, 2009

Recycling means never having to say you’re sorry…your consumerism, your weekly trips to the grocery, all equal out more or less and the world’s resources stay in the mix. But what about all those things we’re still throwing in the trash, or just sticking in a drawer? Here’s a lil’resource guide on what to do with ‘em.

Excerpt below via Vicki Godal:

21 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOU COULD RECYCLE

For all of you out there who’ve asked how to recycle or compost assorted items over the years, here’s our list to post on your refrigerator door and share with friends. Enjoy!

1. Appliances: Goodwill accepts working appliances, www.goodwill.org, or you can contact the Steel Recycling Institute to recycle them: 800YES-1CAN,www.recycle-steel.org.

2. Batteries: Rechargeables and singleuse: Battery Solutions, 734/467-9110,www.batteryrecycllng.com.

3. Cardboard boxes: Contact local nonprofits and women’s shelters to see if they can use them. Or offer them up at your local Freecycle.org listserv or on Craigslist.org. If your workplace collects at least 100 boxes or more each month, UsedCardboardBoxes.com accepts them for resale.

4. CDs/DVDs/Game Disks: Send scratched music or computer CDs, DVDs, and PlayStation or Nintendo video game disks to AuralTech for refinishing, and they’ll work like new: 888/454-3223, www.auraltech.com. For recycling, see “Technotrash.”

5. Clothes: Wearable clothes can go to your local Goodwill outlet or women’s shelter. Donate wearable women’s business clothing to Dress for Success, which gives them to low-income women as they search for jobs, 212/532-1922,www.dressforsuccess.org. Offer unwearable clothes and towels to local animal boarding and shelter facilities, which often use them as pet bedding.

6. Compact fluorescent bulbs: Take them to your local IKEA store for recycling: .www.ikea.com. Or, order a Sylvania RecyclePak for $15, which is a special lined box large enough for eight average CFLs. Your fee covers shipping to and recycling at Veolia Environmental Systems. To order, visitwww.sylvania.com/Recycle/RecyclePak.

7. Compostable bio-,plastics: • You’ll need to take them to a municipal composter; find one at www.findacomposter.com.

8. Computers and electronics: Find responsible recyclers, local and national, atwww.ban.org/pledge/Locations.html.

9. Exercise videos: Swap them with others at www.videofitness.com. (See also “Technotrash.”)

10. Eyeglasses: Your local Lion’s Club or eye care chain may collect these. Lenses are reground and given to people in need.

11 . Foam packing peanuts: Your local pack-and-ship store will likely accept these for reuse. Or, call the Plastic Loose Fill Producers Council to find a drop-off site: 800/828-2214. For places to drop off foam blocks for recycling, contact the Alliance of Foam Packaging Recyclers, 410/451-8340,www.epspackaging.org.

12. Ink/toner cartridges: Recycleplace.com pays $l/each.

13. Miscellaneous: Get your unwanted items into the hands of people who can use them. Offer them up on your local Freecycle.org or Craigslist.org listserv, or try giving them away at Throwplace.com or giving or selling them at iReuse.com. iReuse.com will also help you find a recycler, if possible, when your items have reached the end of their useful lifecycle.

14. Oil: Find Used Motor Oil Hotlines for each state: 202/682-8000,www..recycleoil.org.

15. Phones: Donate cell phones: Collective Good will refurbish your phone and sell it to people in developing
countries: 770/856.;.9021,• www.collectivegood.com. Call to• ‘Protect reprograms cell phones to dial 911 and gives them to domestic violence victims: www.donateaphone.com. Recycle single-linephones:Reclamere,814/386-2927, www.reclamere.com.

16. Sports equipment: Resell or trade it at your local Play It Again Sports outlet, 800/476′-9249, www.playitagainsports.com.

17. “Technotrash”: Easily recycle all of your CDs, jewel cases, DVDs, audio and video tapes, cell phones, pagers, rechargeable and single-use batteries, PDAs, and ink/toner cartridges with GreenDisk’s Technotrash program. For a small fee, GreenDisk will send you a cardboard box in which you can ship them up to 70 pounds of any of the above. Your fee covers the box as well as shipping and recycling fees. 800/305 -GREENDISK, www.greendisk.com.

18. Tennis shoes: Nike’s Reuse-a-Shoe program turns old shoes into playground and athletic flooring: www.nikereuseashoe.com. One World Running will send still-wearable shoes to athletes in need in Africa, Latin America, and Haiti: www.oneworldrunning.com.

19. Toothbrushes and razors: Buy a recycled plastic toothbrush or razor from Recycline, and the company will take it back to be recycled again into plastic lumber. Recycline toothbrushes and razors are made from used StonyfieldFarms’yogurtcups. 888/354-7296; www.recycllne.com

20. Tyvek envelopes: Quantities less than 25: Send to Shirley Cimburke, Tyvek Recycling Specialist, 5401 Jefferson Davis Hwy., Spot 197, Room 231, Richmond, VA 23234. Quantities larger than 25, call 866/33-TYVEK.

21. Stuff you just can’t recycle: When practical, send it back to the company and tell them they need to close the waste loop.

Nice post over at The Examiner. Click here for the whole deal.

About Waylon Lewis

Waylon Lewis, founder of elephant magazine, now elephantjournal.com & host of Walk the Talk Show with Waylon Lewis, is a 1st generation American Buddhist “Dharma Brat." Voted #1 in U.S. on twitter for #green two years running, Changemaker & Eco Ambassador by Treehugger, Green Hero by Discovery’s Planet Green, Best (!) Shameless Self-Promoter at Westword's Web Awards, Prominent Buddhist by Shambhala Sun, & 100 Most Influential People in Health & Fitness 2011 by "Greatist", Waylon is a mediocre climber, lazy yogi, 365-day bicycle commuter & best friend to Redford (his rescue hound). His aim: to bring the good news re: "the mindful life" beyond the choir & to all those who didn't know they gave a care. elephantjournal.com | facebook.com/elephantjournal | twitter.com/elephantjournal | facebook.com/waylonhlewis | twitter.com/waylonlewis | Google+ For more: publisherelephantjournalcom

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8 Responses to “21 Things you’re Not recycling.”

  1. krap master says:

    Thank you for the detailed list on recycling items that were/have been in question. Just a note – most auto parts stores will take your used motor oil. I use Checkers, I dump it myself into their recycle canister in the back room, give them the approx amount I deposited, the oil grade, sign my name and out the door. Super easy and doesn’t cost a cent.

  2. cannon says:

    you can recycle tennis balls with Rebounces.com – the only firm to begin a National Tennis Ball Recycling campaign.

  3. Janet Huey says:

    SInce 1997 I have been recycling pet supplies
    as a business, Pet Stuff Resale, in Houston Texas. Lots of metal no longer goes into landfills and I burn plastic pieces that are no longer usable and not recyclable. I think there is less impact from burning than adding to landfills items that do not break down easily.
    Of course it saves people money also.
    I’m only in Houston so not trying to plug my company; just another way to reduce, reuse, recycle, respect.
    Janet Huey
    petstuffresale.com

  4. Heather says:

    Great tips. Though I would say that “re-using means never having to say you’re sorry.” Recycling still requires huge amounts of energy, so it doesn’t exactly balance out our consumerism completely. But it’s certainly better than the landfill.

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