Is the Yoga Fad over?

Via on Oct 29, 2009

yoga fad

Bloom off the Rose? Or Ancient Tradition, still Going Strong?

Years ago, when I first started elephant, I had the honor to interview John Abbott, the then-publisher and owner of Yoga Journal. He told me how he’d bought it a few years before, and instantly took the great little (30,000 circulation) magazine up to 300,000 circulation by simply printing lots more, shipping ‘em, and seeing what happened.

Lo and behold, the Yoga Fad was on—studios opening as fast as Starbucks, yoga in the news, yoga in Vanity Fair, yoga businesses opening up faster than you can say Namaste.

Click for larger image:

yoga fad onion

10 years after Abbott made his big move, I often wonder if yoga will die back a bit, now that it’s no longer New! and Hot! and now that the economy has cooled. Well, it hasn’t.

Yoga studios continue to open, and despite a down economy, yoga classes are as full as ever, by all reports. Yoga businesses continue to grow. Yoga continues to garner the attention of mainstream press. And Yoga Journal’s circulation has continued to climb:

Active Interest Media today announced substantial gains in newsstand sales for its flagship health title, Yoga Journal. From 2005 to 2006, newsstand circulation grew 13.4%, and averaged over 100,000 copies in newsstand sales per issue, according to the December 2006 Audit Bureau of Circulation Fas-Fax.

So yes, the yoga fad is over. It’s no longer new news to the mainstream. But it’s taken root—as Trungpa Rinpoche used to say about Buddhism in the West, the flower has taken root upon the rock. And it continues to bloom.

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8 Responses to “Is the Yoga Fad over?”

  1. One of the things I've been arguing is that traditional spiritual Yoga is growing at a healthy pace, too, but this is masked by the far greater growth and visibility of more commercial workout Yoga (which I also think is great–I like all kinds of Yoga).

    But I haven't been able to come up with any statistics to prove my point. Some prominent Yoga bloggers feel that traditional Yoga is in danger of extinction in the face of the degenerating commercial popularity. From my vantage point, I just don't believe that to be true. In fact, I think workout Yoga is a very effective feeder system for those who eventually choose to get into the meditation, spirituality and study aspects of Yoga.

    Can anyone help me out here? The most likely statistic would be a trend line of Yoga teachers by style of Yoga. Otherwise I'll just keep going around in circles in these debates.

    Bob Weisenberg
    http://YogaDemystified.com

  2. One of the things I've been arguing is that traditional spiritual Yoga is growing at a healthy pace, too, but this is masked by the far greater growth and visibility of more commercial workout Yoga (which I also think is great–I like all kinds of Yoga).

    But I haven't been able to come up with any statistics to prove my point. Some prominent Yoga bloggers feel that traditional Yoga is in danger of extinction in the face of the degenerating commercial popularity. From my vantage point, I just don't believe that to be true. In fact, I think workout Yoga is a very effective feeder system for those who eventually choose to get into the meditation, spirituality and study aspects of Yoga.

    Can anyone help me out here? The most likely statistic would be a trend line of Yoga teachers by style of Yoga. Otherwise I'll just keep going around in circles in these debates.

    Bob Weisenberg
    http://YogaDemystified.com

  3. One of the things I've been arguing is that traditional spiritual Yoga is growing at a healthy pace, too, but this is masked by the far greater growth and visibility of more commercial workout Yoga (which I also think is great–I like all kinds of Yoga).

    But I haven't been able to come up with any statistics to prove my point. Some prominent Yoga bloggers feel that traditional Yoga is in danger of extinction in the face of the degenerating commercial popularity. From my vantage point, I just don't believe that to be true. In fact, I think workout Yoga is a very effective feeder system for those who eventually choose to get into the meditation, spirituality and study aspects of Yoga.

    Can anyone help me out here? The most likely statistic would be a trend line of Yoga teachers by style of Yoga. Otherwise I'll just keep going around in circles in these debates.

    Bob Weisenberg
    http://YogaDemystified.com

  4. One of the things I've been arguing is that traditional spiritual Yoga is growing at a healthy pace, too, but this is masked by the far greater growth and visibility of more commercial workout Yoga (which I also think is great–I like all kinds of Yoga).

    But I haven't been able to come up with any statistics to prove my point. Some prominent Yoga bloggers feel that traditional Yoga is in danger of extinction in the face of the degenerating commercial popularity. From my vantage point, I just don't believe that to be true. In fact, I think workout Yoga is a very effective feeder system for those who eventually choose to get into the meditation, spirituality and study aspects of Yoga.

    Can anyone help me out here? The most likely statistic would be a trend line of Yoga teachers by style of Yoga. Otherwise I'll just keep going around in circles in these debates.

    Bob Weisenberg
    http://YogaDemystified.com

  5. One of the things I've been arguing is that traditional spiritual Yoga is growing at a healthy pace, too, but this is masked by the far greater growth and visibility of more commercial workout Yoga (which I also think is great–I like all kinds of Yoga).

    But I haven't been able to come up with any statistics to prove my point. Some prominent Yoga bloggers feel that traditional Yoga is in danger of extinction in the face of the degenerating commercial popularity. From my vantage point, I just don't believe that to be true. In fact, I think workout Yoga is a very effective feeder system for those who eventually choose to get into the meditation, spirituality and study aspects of Yoga.

    Can anyone help me out here? The most likely statistic would be a trend line of Yoga teachers by style of Yoga. Otherwise I'll just keep going around in circles in these debates.

    Bob Weisenberg
    http://YogaDemystified.com

  6. One of the things I've been arguing is that traditional spiritual Yoga is growing at a healthy pace, too, but this is masked by the far greater growth and visibility of more commercial workout Yoga (which I also think is great–I like all kinds of Yoga).

    But I haven't been able to come up with any statistics to prove my point. Some prominent Yoga bloggers feel that traditional Yoga is in danger of extinction in the face of the degenerating commercial popularity. From my vantage point, I just don't believe that to be true. In fact, I think workout Yoga is a very effective feeder system for those who eventually choose to get into the meditation, spirituality and study aspects of Yoga.

    Can anyone help me out here? The most likely statistic would be a trend line of Yoga teachers by style of Yoga. Otherwise I'll just keep going around in circles in these debates.

    Bob Weisenberg
    http://YogaDemystified.com

  7. One of the things I've been arguing is that traditional spiritual Yoga is growing at a healthy pace, too, but this is masked by the far greater growth and visibility of more commercial workout Yoga (which I also think is great–I like all kinds of Yoga).

    But I haven't been able to come up with any statistics to prove my point. Some prominent Yoga bloggers feel that traditional Yoga is in danger of extinction in the face of the degenerating commercial popularity. From my vantage point, I just don't believe that to be true. In fact, I think workout Yoga is a very effective feeder system for those who eventually choose to get into the meditation, spirituality and study aspects of Yoga.

    Can anyone help me out here? The most likely statistic would be a trend line of Yoga teachers by style of Yoga. Otherwise I'll just keep going around in circles in these debates.

    Bob Weisenberg
    http://YogaDemystified.com

  8. One of the things I've been arguing is that traditional spiritual Yoga is growing at a healthy pace, too, but this is masked by the far greater growth and visibility of more commercial workout Yoga (which I also think is great–I like all kinds of Yoga).

    But I haven't been able to come up with any statistics to prove my point. Some prominent Yoga bloggers feel that traditional Yoga is in danger of extinction in the face of the degenerating commercial popularity. From my vantage point, I just don't believe that to be true. In fact, I think workout Yoga is a very effective feeder system for those who eventually choose to get into the meditation, spirituality and study aspects of Yoga.

    Can anyone help me out here? The most likely statistic would be a trend line of Yoga teachers by style of Yoga. Otherwise I'll just keep going around in circles in these debates.

    Bob Weisenberg
    http://YogaDemystified.com

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