How Does Martin Luther King Jr. Inspire You?

Via on Jan 17, 2011

This year, in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Washington Post produced this video entreating the general public to answer the question “How does Martin Luther King Jr. inspire you?”

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Some of the video responses have been posted on their website, and can be viewed here.

Just a little light viewing to reflect the gravity and utter importance of taking this day to honor a man of true integrity and vision. Enjoy, and happy MLK Day!

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7 Responses to “How Does Martin Luther King Jr. Inspire You?”

  1. elephantjournal says:

    #
    Mary: I was in Chicago as a child when he was there. My relatives did not like him because there was violence where he appeared. They have mostly changed and voted for Obama. I got a mixed message; fear of violence and that powerful black guy and the reality of the Civil Rights laws. As an adult, I moved to Denver from OC,CA and learned to work with all sorts of people. I am still delighted to do so though I have trouble with some believing my naivety is somehow cynical.

    #
    Toi: Absolute inspiration! I cry every time I hear his speeches, especially 'I have been to the mountain top'. Great man, with great wisdom, and eloquence of speech. I hope to see his 'dreams' come true.

  2. Kate Bowers says:

    We share a birthday, Dr King, and I and that's how I celebrate. Saturday evening at my home in a small rural village, a Baptist Minister, Dr Bill Malcomson, spoke about his life changing experience during the March on Washington in 1963. I happen to teach voice to a few bright young girls and his granddaughter, Grace, is one. She led the 25 people assembled to sing We Shall Overcome, arms linked, as was done in King's day. Dr Malcomson and I quietly wept. I'd started by singing Imagine that night, because many radio stations refused to play it during the period following 9/11. After a break five more peace activists spoke about their work with vets, with rural blacks, with glbt and homeless kids, with the Transition movement, most moved by their religious faith, spiritual practice or love. I have come to value the sort of moral courage shown by King and others deeply, sincerely and openly borrow their strength to increase my own in that regard.

  3. I feel and have always felt, a deep connection to MLK. I remember listening to my radio at age 15, while taking a bath and hearing of his murder. It seemed like those days (1968), bad things were happening all the time. I was born into a middle class white family who had many close ties with black families, so I didn't understand the hate. MLK appealed (s) to my idealistic, social activism heart. He gave his most precious gifts, his time, his skills and his life. If I can live my life even in small part as he did, I will consider it a life well lived. Thanks MLK.

  4. Tom says:

    I remember the first time i ever heard of MLK, 1976 in a religous education class at school.
    Been hooked ever since.
    What i find facinating is, he was fairly well off, did he need to get involved in civil rights?
    When i think of bravery, i think of MLK

  5. Kimberly Lo kimberlylowriter says:

    He inspired me to believe in the power of one and that change for the better can happen.

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