Quotable Insights: The Benefit of Being Lost

Via on Feb 1, 2011

Like many people, I find quotes to be exceptionally inspiring. It is truly amazing how a particular sequence of words can change your entire mood, perspective, and overall outlook on life. Quotes can take on an entire life of their own … and that’s what I’m here to explore. In each “Quotable Insights” post, I’ll share one of my favorite quotes, along with an expanded contemplation on its meaning.

“If we don’t get lost, we’ll never find a new route.” – Joan Littlewood

The concept of fear infiltrates our lives. Though it comes in many forms, a extremely common fear is that of the unknown. From something as simple as knowing the directions to a new restaurant to the complexity of choosing a career or a life-long partner, fear of the unknown is ever-present.

We long for a schedule, a time line, a guide book – some sort of organization amongst the chaos of the world. But what if you were lost? Whether emotionally, psychologically, or literally, being lost evokes feelings of failure & helplessness.

Here’s my question: Why? Why do we assume that being lost is a negative thing? Happiness, self-appreciation, and the revolutionary events of the world don’t happen when people do whatever everyone else does. We must take the time to explore ourselves & the world around us. We must question the norm & delve into areas that make us uncomfortable. The fear we once knew will be stripped away & replaced by a sense of wonder and acceptance.

Life is a journey with an unknown final destination (death notwithstanding). There is no other “you” in the entire expanse of the universe. Your journey is unique, your route is unknown. You are bound to get lost along the way, but that doesn’t mean you aren’t worthy or capable of exploring all life has to offer.

When we are lost, we truly free. We can experience the unbridled possibilities of life, love, dedication, and inspiration. Our hearts and minds can fly in any direction we can imagine. The opportunities are endless and the probability is needless. Like the ancient Chinese concept of Ying & Yang, we can’t have one opposite without the other. You wouldn’t know love without hate, happiness without sadness, and we can’t be found without first being lost.

The next time someone tells you to “Get Lost”, tell them “Thank You” and wish the same blessing on them.

How do you interpret this quote?

[Photo credit: Ashley R Good]

About Victoria Klein

Introduced to Yoga in 2000 at a gym in Connecticut, my personal practice has taken me through a crippling post-high-school era of depression and anxiety, 3 cross-country relocations, + the general rollercoaster of life. In 2012, I fulfilled a major item on my bucket list by graduating from the True Nature School of Yoga 200-Hour program in Oceanside, CA + eagerly began teaching as an RYT 200. In 2013, I've continued my dedication to education by taking True Nature's 500-Hour program, progressing toward the RYT 500 designation. Also a professional freelance writer since 2005, my first book, 27 Things to Know about Yoga, was published in 2010. I previously worked the front desk at the well-known Yoga Tree studios in San Francisco + in the production department at Yoga Journal Magazine. In my spare time, you’ll find me cooking, running, taking lots of pictures, being a Marine Corps spouse, and infusing Yoga into my entire life. My Yoga classes are a dynamic blend of effort + ease, sweating + relaxation, with numerous opportunities + options given to make each individual class easier or harder, depending on how you feel that day. As a teacher, I strive to help my students find clarity, compassion, + patience, both on + off the mat. FYI: you should join my newsletter so you don't miss any of the fun! You can also connect with me on Facebook, Twitter, + Pinterest!

2,118 views

Appreciate this article? Support indie media!

(We use super-secure PayPal - but don't worry - you don't need an account with PayPal.)

17 Responses to “Quotable Insights: The Benefit of Being Lost”

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by kevingilkes, Red Fox. Red Fox said: Quotable Insights: The Benefit of Being Lost http://bit.ly/eBvT1l [...]

  2. Brigitte says:

    Hi Victoria – I've been thinking about these themes lately, as they're highly relevant to my life right now. It took me a long time to embrace the messiness of life, but doing so has led me down a path I never imagined possible.

    Love your meditation on this quote.

    • Hello Brigitte – always a joy to see a comment from you! :) The natural chaos of life is a very difficult concept to embrace, but like life, it is an ongoing journey. You are doing a fantastic job – just be yourself & all is well :)

  3. Love "The next time someone tells you to “Get Lost”, tell them “Thank You” and wish the same blessing on them.", except I'm such a nice guy hardly anyone ever tells me to get lost.

    • Haha, I even giggled a bit when I wrote that line. No many folks tell me to "Get Lost" either, but it all depends on where you live. In bigger cities, one is certainly more likely to hear it on a regular basis.

  4. ARCreated says:

    but I "bless" others in this way often LOL…

    as a self proclaimed "gypsy at heart" I have always thought the idea of being "lost" as silly…one is never LOST just discovering a new way :)and I am fond of "getting lost" in books, music and online debates… I loved your take on this…

    • Hahaha, well said, AR! I have found myself to be a bit of a gypsy as well. In essence, no one is every truly "lost", but rather misplaced. We always find our way back to a sensible path eventually.

  5. Steve says:

    "Amazing Grace" came to mind as I read your post. For me, the "grace" is not the judeo-christian variety, however. My grace is the gift of discovery, of allowing myself to be curious, to seek a new understanding, to be open to new thought. I was amazingly lost for many years without knowing it. The essence of the energy that gives me breath has since graced me with the realization that I am, in fact, lost to the world of form and function, yet, found to the spirit of all that shimmers and vibrates to the music of the spheres. Pretty cool for a wretch like me! Ha! Now I see.

    • A wonderful comparison, Steve! Grace is not something that should be restricted by one's religious preference. I'm not Christian, but I do find "Amazing Grace" to be a spectacular & inspirational song.

      Curiosity is the ultimate antidote to fear – something that we don't instill in our younger generations, much to our own demise.

  6. Thank you, Victoria, for this affirmation! We need contrast, don't we.
    I just came out of the most incredible, insightful, and frightening lostness.
    And in that lostness, I had to examine trust! Trust that I am creating the experiences that I need to expand into this universe. To be available, with an open and tender heart…to everything. Just being able to say "YES" to everything was key. It was part of surrendering to the lostness, to see what gifts would emerge from it. Contrast is such a great teacher. That, coupled with trust…Shazam!! Experience-Expansion-Joy!

  7. Thanks for this contemplation on getting lost. It is a wonderful reminder of how life's challenges actually push us to consider new possibilities and new journeys in life.

  8. Audrey Mangan says:

    Getting lost has always been my least favorite thing, because I can't help feeling like it's such a big waste of time. Next time I will try to remember these wise words. Thanks for sharing!

    • I used to be the very same way, Audrey, and our society definitely teaches us that last = bad, but we can choose to believe otherwise. When I made that choice, my life became exponentially better than I could have imagined. It's not a magical change, but every time you decide not to feel bad about being lost, your heart glows a little bit more :)

  9. [...] take the wrong one. We arrive in a town only to find that the hostel we wanted to stay at is full. We get lost over and over again. The upside to all these unmet expectations is that there is always a solution [...]

  10. Thank you, Clare – I'm glad you enjoyed the post :) Many people find a greater meaning for life in their spiritual & religions beliefs. My husband is a believer in God, and I'm a Buddhist. No matter your preference, life is a wonderful journey that should not be spent LIVING not CONTROLLING :)

Leave a Reply