Buddhism and the Occupy Movement: Taking Care of Our Anger

Via on Oct 28, 2011

A talk given by Michael Stone at Occupy Montreal on October 23, 2011
on taking care of our anger in order to sustain the movement.

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More: www.centreofgravity.org

Photo: Andrea de Keijzer

About Michael Stone (Centre of Gravity)

Centre of Gravity is a thriving community of Yoga and Buddhist practitioners integrating committed formal practice and modern urban life. We offer weekly sits, text studies, yoga practice and dharma talks. Retreats, guest speakers, online courses and audio talks deepen the feel. Each week Michael Stone dishes a talk, often on primary texts by Dogen, Patanjali, and the Buddha, that are collaged with today's headlines and psychological insights to produce an engaged shape shifting dharma, at once historical, personal and political. Notes on these talks by Mike Hoolboom form the heart of this blog. Michael Stone is a yoga teacher and Buddhist teacher. He travels internationally teaching about the intersection of Yoga, Buddhism and mental health. He has written four books with Shambhala Publications on ethics, yoga's subtle body, inner/outer pilgrimmages, and the sometimes uneasy blend of social engagement and Buddhism. Please check out the website at www.centreofgravity.org .

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12 Responses to “Buddhism and the Occupy Movement: Taking Care of Our Anger”

  1. kunga rangdröl says:

    I was just reading an interview with Michael Meade, he talks about how our culture is bereft of creativity and imagination due to our mass marketing and homogenization. we are incapable of creative solutions to the problems that our technology, politics, and economics have created. it is a spiritual malaise; we don't know how to be "peace makers"…but we must learn.

    • sama says:

      Yes because Buddhism knows everything… Sarcasm at it's best.

      Funny how (no names) he brought buddhism to north america and started (no names) foundation. He was so enlightened that he had to snort how many thousands of dollars of cocaine a year.. He went to most of his talks so drunk most people didn't understand everything he said. His right hand man spread aids to some many with out knowing..

      Right. Buddhism.. BS organization like the rest.

      • sama says:

        with out them knowing* he knew fully that he was infected.
        I could go on and on about the racism with in buddhism too. and hierarchy..

      • Jason Lee says:

        Absolutely correct. Yoga is a part of the 1%….yoga has become a billion dollar a year industry. Yoga classes in NYC average about $25 a class, not including rental mats, designer clothing and jet setting yoga teachers. What a joke!

  2. Tanya Lee Markul Tanya Lee Markul says:

    One love.

    Posting to Elephant Yoga on Facebook and Twitter.

    Tanya Lee Markul, Yoga Editor
    Join us! Like Elephant Yoga on Facebook
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    Just posted to "Featured Today" on the Elephant Yoga homepage.

  3. Sue says:

    Done with this… Good bye elephant journal.

  4. Padma Kadag says:

    Why do we need to place ourselves in a position as an individual which "represents" Buddhism? If we feel compelled to speak then we should speak from where we as an individual really are. Otherwise it comes off as an intellectual sermon. Frankly if you listen to this sermon I do not see it as paricularly Buddhist. Buddha this ….Buddha that…those buildings you wish to "bring down" do they not house beings who wish only to be happy? Too much posting of an individual's "take " on Buddhism.

  5. johnm says:

    buddhism in north america is being shown for what it is. A money hungry organization full of elitists.
    It is quite sad. Because of this i've left the community and now practice on my own.

  6. Joe Sparks says:

    " All for one and one for all" is a direction which interests many individuals but which requires a group commitment for it to become very meaningful or effective.

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