Discussion: The Introduction [Rod Stryker’s Four Desires (4D) Virtual Book Club]

Via on Oct 15, 2011

Discussion: The Introduction
What inspires you in The Four Desires introduction?

Happiness. The idea that everyone is seeking happiness inspires me. I have been waiting a long time for this book to come out. On it’s release date I turned on my ipad and saw The Four Desires waiting in my bookshelf. It made my day to read the first sentence “Happiness.” Having taken the Yoga of Fulfillment training and knowing what this book would ask of me, reading that first line made me pause, take a breath, and be grateful for my teacher. I stared at the word and remembered how thrilling and daunting it was to go through all the different exercises. “Happiness” stared back at me; a reminder that this path of deep and thorough soul exploration has a happy ending.

The common denominator, seldom remembered, is that “there is no more basic or universal drive than the desire to be happy.” There are a lot of things that will make me feel happy, but is that happiness long lasting and true to my soul? The introduction outlines what is to be expected of the book. It wisely reminds us that we need to apply what has been learned: “success is less the result of what you know than the cumulative effect of what you do.”

Now that we have a few things in common (seeking happiness, reading The Four Desires, and applying these teachings), lets get this virtual book club going!

What inspires you in The Four Desires introduction?

Aloha,
Chanti

Read The Four Desires book review on Elephant Journal.
Read other discussions about The Four Desires
Instructions: How the book club works


 

About Chanti Tacoronte-Perez

As a traveler and painter Chanti has grounded her roots in the path of yoga wherever she has landed. Chanti began practicing Yoga during her first year in college & continued when she left for Hampshire College to complete her BA in Painting/Fine Arts and Special Education. From 2001-2004 she lived and worked in Havana, Cuba as the Hampshire College Cuba Program Coordinator where she studied Iyengar Yoga. Chanti has been studying and teaching yoga in the Tantric Hatha Linage since 2005 with her teacher Rod Stryker, founder of Para Yoga. He has taught her that everyone has the ability to know their destination and find that road to walk on. She has currently completed the Para Yoga Certification (level I) & her Restorative Yoga training with Judith Handson Lasater. Her study of Sacred Art and Yantra Painting merge her love of Yoga with her passion for painting and education. http://www.ohanashakti.com

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39 Responses to “Discussion: The Introduction [Rod Stryker’s Four Desires (4D) Virtual Book Club]”

  1. I love the way the Introduction neatly solves the problem of "spiritual" vs. "material" by dismantling the boundaries between them. In Tantra, as in the Bhagavad Gita, everything is spiritual.

    I also think it's interesting that the cover title and cover notes avoid or de-emphasize the Yoga and Tantric aspects of the book, whereas the text itself is steeped in ancient philosophy and the quotes are mostly straight from the ancient texts.

    I can just imagine the conversations that must have occurred between Rod and the marketing people. In the end, I think this approach is good because "Four Desires" will draw many more people in than "Ancient Yoga Philosophy" would.

    Great to be here, and great to see this virtual book club get started. Welcome to Elephant, everyone. Please spread the word to all your friends.

    Bob W. Editor
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    • Chanti says:

      What a Tantric beginning to this club. Thanks for all your help and support!

    • missmiapark says:

      bob, you are such a mover & do-er of so many, many things good. THANK YOU.

    • Amy Whelan says:

      What grabbed me initially was the fact that Rod made reading and understanding his book so very accessible to all. I was amazed at the simplicity of his meditation instructions. I also was amazed that he put his meditations in the book to be recorded so that you wouldn't need to purchase his voice…but, hey! Why would I want my voice? His is so perfect. So naturally, I downloaded his meditations to my iPod. Ahhhhh, the happiness that is inherent in all of us makes me feel blessed to be alive!

  2. [...] Discussion: The Introduction What inspires you in The Four Desires introduction? As a traveler and painter Chanti has grounded her roots in the path of yoga wherever she has landed. Chanti began practicing Yoga during her first year in college & continued when she left for Hampshire College to complete her BA in Painting/Fine Arts and Special Education. From 2001-2004 she lived and worked in Havana, Cuba as the Hampshire College Cuba Program Coordinator where she studied Iyengar Yoga. Chanti has been studying and teaching yoga in the Tantric Hatha Linage since 2005 with her teacher Rod Stryker, founder of Para Yoga. He has taught her that everyone has the ability to know their destination and find that road to walk on. She has currently completed the Para Yoga Certification (level I) & her Restorative Yoga training with Judith Handson Lasater. Her study of Sacred Art and Yantra Painting merge her love of Yoga with her passion for painting and education. [...]

  3. Jessica Durivage Jessica says:

    YES!!!! I can't wait to participate in this! One thousand blessings to the elej and PY teams for manifesting this! Spreading the word and also looking forward to sharing my thoughts.

    My heart is literally swelling right now. Now, THIS is what I would like my abiding contentment to feel like all the time!

  4. Chanti says:

    Jessica thank you for making all this come to life, it is pretty amazing.

  5. Help spread the word by liking on StumbleUpon: http://bit.ly/pfF7jM

  6. Patrick says:

    Hello 4D book club family…:-) I am elated to begin the discussions here too. Is this the thread that we'll be using from today on?

    For me, I am at the part in the book where I need to re-listen to the Bliss Meditation and write my Sankalpa…

    love & light,

    Patrick :-) xo

  7. Patrick says:

    Thank you Chanti! xo

    Mahalo :-)

  8. Tanya Lee Markul Tanya Lee Markul says:

    Just posted to "Featured Today" on the Elephant Yoga homepage.

    Tanya Lee Markul, Yoga Editor
    Join us! Like Elephant Yoga on Facebook
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  9. Tanya Lee Markul Tanya Lee Markul says:

    Thank you so much Chanti!

    Posting to Elephant Yoga on Facebook and Twitter.

    Tanya Lee Markul, Yoga Editor
    Join us! Like Elephant Yoga on Facebook
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  10. Julie says:

    I was inspired by how Rod dealt with my doubts and fears of the book in the introduction. I like that there's a science, a formula we can use. I also liked that he thought to say it's okay to read the book first without doing the exercises. I love it that he addressed the challenges one might face, and stated that they will be dealt with in the body of the book. The challenges are all things I thought before I started reading.

    Thanks for giving a forum for discussion!

  11. garuda65 says:

    How do we build happiness and stay in this house when we've built it? Our culture seems to negate happiness at every turn, telling us we smell bad, don't make enough money and can't attract a mate unless we purchase some product. This relentless bombardment of advertising causes many of us to see ourselves externally instead of internally as yoga encourages to do. The Four Desires offers us a path by which we can discover our inner, inate happy state and remain there indefinitely. I was deeply moved by Rod's statement that the practices along this path can "build your energy and direct your resolve." This is something I can sink my teeth into. I live in an outlying area, have a young business and minimal funds. I don't have the ability to travel to the ParaYoga teacher trainings but I have the desire to acquire the learning. I can use succinct direction to get me on the way to achieving both my material and yogic goals. Let's get this party started! Om Shanti Om.

    • Chanti says:

      Hi Garuda, what a great contribution. Can you imagine a community with simple happy people, something to look forward to and to be part of. Even if you can't take the training now, you have such a brilliant guide: The Four Desires! I have taken the training, felt it's power and the book is as rewarding for me at this moment. Glad to have you as part of our 4D club!
      Aloha

  12. Denise Alston says:

    I love that the introduction sets to rest the notion that having desire is a bad thing. What freedom comes to me from this simple affirmation. It also suggests that it's ok to want the things that have been elusive to me; those things that have been difficult to achieve or acquite in the four areas of life. I have finished reading the book, taken the five-day training but welcome this opportunity to discuss the book with a community because I feel I can get the most out of it in this way. Thank you so much for getting this started, Chanti. It's great to see Mia here, too. I'm hoping that some of the recent Kriplau YoF participants will join us as well. I know they're busy working on their book reports!

    • Chanti says:

      Hi Denise,
      Well said! The reading is so much smoother, when the idea that desire is "negative" has moved out of the way. Thanks for being part of our discussion, looking forward to "seeing" you here.
      Aloha

  13. ARCreated says:

    it's like coming home…its as if Rod had a direct line into my thought process and put it into print. Like getting permission to live the life I want

  14. Sue Neufeld says:

    What inspires me – other than ALL of it? The quote from Srimad Bhagavatam: "Deep within lies a real and everlasting joy. A human being is born to dive deep into the stream of life, find the hidden treasure, and attain eternal fulfillment."
    It doesn't get better than this.
    It's thrilling to have an on-line "sangha" (community). Let's dive together. Love and light

  15. Heather says:

    All great words of truth. Happiness. In many ways always seems elusive until we change our view. The introduction sums up ‘changing the view.’ for me.

    Also being a very analytical thinker, I love that there is a ‘step by step’ process to finding equilibrium to life. I agree with Sue, so appreciative of an online forum. I am excited to read the book again and again.

    Hugs

  16. Michael says:

    Hi Everyone from my Hermit's Cave…. My favorite working definition of Yoga has always been "the still point in the constantly changing world". I will admit, it is a strange state to be in… to be "in" this world, but not "of" this world… to be still, calm, content, engaged, aware, in awe, … but unaffected by the constant shiftings. Happiness seems like it should be a by-product of "getting what we want", and its allusiveness might be our only motivation to hang onto the seemingly nonsensical flux of life. But Life conspires to hone our path into a fine-pointed purpose. Maybe not on the grand scale that we think we deserve, but certainly, to a point that is satisfyingly affirming of our existence.
    I was just thinking yesterday how much of our thought process is made up of trying to justify our actions, or conditions, our opinions. Its very natural to want feedback that affirms us; in fact, its part of our brain's mechanics to seek closure that it has the "right" answer. When we reach that amazingly unsatisfying conclusion that every possibility is true, not just the ones that we have experienced ourselves or the ones that justify that our beliefs and that our actions and directions are "worthwhile", we can easily have a existential crisis. But the beauty of growth and consciousness is that every experience is valid, provides a perspective, and, if we do not hold too tightly to our own sense of righteousness about that experience, particularly in the sense of "this was true once, so therefore it must be true forever", then we can begin to see totality of existence as a continuum of all things, connected at the center. The "dance of life" requires the dynamic contrast of energies to move, but moving only in one direction is impossible. Too far from the center, we lose our "equilibrium". Life always sends us back from where we came. Happiness, therefore is not an over-abundance of the things we want. Nor is it the absence of things to be wanted. Happiness is the only true state of equilibrium where all things are satisfying, all moments appreciated, and the ultimate destination of our path resolved. Peace to all.

  17. Vanita says:

    The presentation of desire as not necessarily negative stood out for me. The spiritual quest is one born of desire. I've never understood how it can be inherently negative.

    I also found the material to be very readable. It had a conversational tone that I really liked.

  18. [...] still tried to maintain my presence in Gita Talk, I’m behind in the virtual book club for the Four Desires (partly because in addition to the EJ book Club I am running my own private small [...]

  19. "Eternal fulfillment is both an art and a science" is the first sentence of the last paragraph of the introduction. This book is full of technologies to scientifically bring us toward our highest purpose. It reminds me that we are not destined to simply flail through life hoping to stumble upon our purpose (though, actually, I do think we do this) — this book helps us SEE the purpose we are stumbling upon and see that we have the answers, experiences, intuitions, and synchronicities all lining up behind us. It helps us "connect the dots backward" as Steve Jobs said — to see how our purpose is simply pulsing through our lives. I love how as we take a step toward naming our deepest desires and dharma, that it gets brighter. It is an exciting endeavor. The artistry comes through practice and application.

  20. Hugo Ortiz says:

    Greetings from Mexico!
    My partner and I have recently received the four desires book and we have began enjoying the wisdom and light to our path it has provided so far.

    Now we need to apply what we learn. :)
    All the best to all.

  21. Chanti says:

    Hi Paula thanks for sharing! As your process continues and you become familiar with the principles, then the clarity will continue to grow as you do!!

  22. missmiapark says:

    hi, paula. i agree, clarity is always a great first step. i so appreciate having this manual of how to find (or i should say REVEAL) this clarity in order to move appropriately through our maya world.

  23. missmiapark says:

    those are really great things to be inspired by, marycate! i also like mani's words about yoga being life & i love what you wrote about even parts of yoga potentially becoming addictive. we can choose to link ourselves to whatever numbing technique we want in order to avoid the discomfort of growth. thanks for your comments.

  24. Chanti says:

    Mary Cate I couldn't agree more. Laughing is such a great sign of yoga penetrating off the mat!!!
    I too have move to a new city, and laughter has been such a part of getting my roots in, as has working with this book and reconnecting and accepting my own desires. Good luck and glad to have you as part of this discussion.
    Aloha
    Chanti

  25. Chanti says:

    Welcome veloyogi,
    Glad you are here and sharing with us & diving into dharma (again, for some of us).
    Aloha,
    Chanti

  26. veloyogi says:

    By the way, it is I, Barbra Brady using the Veloyogi moniker!

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