The ‘Almighty’ Psoas Muscle: Your Body’s Center of Movement. ~ David Keil

Via on Oct 21, 2011

The foundation of our bodies and our yoga practice lies at our feet. 

In order to incorporate both physical and energetic foundations, we must examine our body’s center of energy, movement and balance which begins near the psoas muscle– the pair of deep muscles extending from the sides of the spine to the femur that are activated in postures like forward bending (paschimottanasana), Boat pose; and lengthened in poses like Warrior I and Bow. 

To understand the psoas muscles, we first need to describe some of the surrounding structures. Imagine looking at a body from the front (anterior) then stripping the skin away (yes, a bit gruesome). Peel away the layer of muscles over the abdomen and then remove the organs.

You’ll now be looking at the front of the spine with its large vertebral bodies sandwiching those sometimes not-so- happy, but very important discs. You’re now looking at your back/spine from the front.

Looking down a bit you see the inside of your bowl-shaped pelvis with your sacrum towards the back and the pelvic floor muscles in place connecting from it to your pubic bone.  Lying over the front, and to the sides of your pubic bone, is a thick muscle that heads up to the sides of your vertebral bodies and drops down to connect to a spot on the inside and back of your thigh bone (femur).  This is the almighty psoas.

The psoas gets a lot of attention, and for good reason.  Roughly triangular in shape, the top of the psoas attaches along five vertebral bodies starting at the last thoracic vertebrae (T12) and continues to attach to each vertebral body, usuallyterminating at the next to last Lumbar vertebrae (L4). This completes one side of the triangle. From the ends of this side, we create two more sides that slowly come together and attach at that spot on the femur.

Because the psoas is triangular, the different portions of the triangle can have a different effects on the spine, and therefore the body. Usually when we describe a muscle and the action that it does we talk about the bone that it makes move, in this case, the femur.The psoas insertion is on the femur. Movements happen at joints, so whichever joint is crossed by the psoas has the potential to be moved by this muscle.  With the spine stabilized,as it mostly is, the psoas makes us perform flexion at the hip joint as in a forward bend. What happens if we stabilize the femur?  Can the psoas then move the spine? You bet, and at this point we’ve reversed the origin and insertion.

If we stabilize the femur, the upper half of the triangle has the potential to pull the spine down and forward as it attaches to the last thoracic vertebrae. The lower half of the psoas pulls mostly on the lumbars and therefore pulls them down and forward which would makes the pelvis tip forward and down. This sometimes shows up as a sway back. If you stand up and tilt your pelvis down and forward you’ll probably feel how short your low back gets. Back pain anyone?

How does the psoas show up in our yoga practice? Probably the most powerful place is in back bending in all variations such as Cobra, Bow, and Camel where we lengthen and open the front of our bodies, and important action that reverses most of what we do all day: sitting, driving, working on the computing etc… A tight psoas, along with other muscles make back bends very difficult. When back bending, it’s often a good idea to tuck your tailbone (the opposite of the action described above). This will give length to your lower back.  Yoga is about creating length in your body; find it wherever you can in your poses.

Aside from back bending, the psoas muscles are commonlyused in forward bends to pull you down and forward. All too often people rely on their arms to pull them forward. Because the psoas also helps regulate balance, it is used in every standing posture to stabilize the upper and lower half of the body. Our center of gravity is roughly at the top of our sacrum, and psoas just happens to pass on both sides of this sacred bone so it helps regulate balance around our center of gravity which is where movement comes from.

Chakras, Bhandas and Fred Astaire

If you look at the space between the top and the bottom of the psoas, you will find some interesting pieces of yogic anatomy.  Within its’ span are the lowest three chakras which control our instincts for survival, sexual energy and power.  If you incorporate bandhas (internal energetic valves) into your practice you’ll find the mula and udhiyana bandhas within the realm of the psoas.

If you come from this place, both physically and energetically, you will have an amazing practice.  An example of someone who moved from this space is Fred Astaire who gingerly floated a few inches above the ground as he danced.  His movement originated from his psoas. I doubt that he was consciously aware of it, but his movements emanated from his psoas to his toes and fingertips. I’m sure he didn’t know it but he also utilized the bandhas and the energy to move his body. Just like any of the great yogis teaching out there now, Astaire mastered this area of his body and called on it regularly for strength and energy.

Using the psoas in Sun Salutes

Let’s do a sun salutation paying special attention to our psoas.  With your weight evenly balanced on both feet, become aware of the space near the level of your navel. Imagine finding length from your psoas as your spine lifts from your center.  Every time you inhale, feel yourself getting longer from your psoas and spine.  Do your first sun salutation very slowly and imagine every movement growing and blossoming from this area of your body.  After you’ve done a few Sun Salutations, find your way into Warrior I.Sink into your legs and feel how grounded you are. From that very grounded and strong foundation lift your torso out and up through your psoas; your arms are reaching from your psoas, your spine and head growing longer from– yes you got it– your psoas.

Want more? Visit David’s psoas resource page.

Related articles: The Anatomy of Chaturanga.

David Keil is an Ashtanga practitioner and Authorized to teach by KPJAYI in Mysore. David has traveled around the world teaching yoga workshops as well as anatomy to yoga teachers and practitioners since 2001. David is known for his simplicity in such a complex subject. He has a straight forward and no frills delivery that makes the anatomy come alive in a way you’ve never experienced. He leaves space for you to make your own connections to your practice. www.yoganatomy.com.


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17 Responses to “The ‘Almighty’ Psoas Muscle: Your Body’s Center of Movement. ~ David Keil”

  1. David I am SO enjoying these articles tying into the anatomy & physiology of yoga. This week I have been spending time learning about special orthopedic tests for psoas tightness and techniques to address it (massage therapy). It's amazing to see the correlations between where people are holding back in their bodies and where they hold back emotionally/spiritually/energetically. Thanks for writing it!

  2. B. Goodrich-Dunn says:

    My favorite muscle ever!

  3. amelia says:

    yes. this was wicked awesome. i am a yoga instructor who finds anatomy to be a snooze in general, so thank you for making it interesting, accessible and relevant to chakras, bandhas and fred astaire. that helped. alot!

  4. Tanya Lee Markul Tanya Lee Markul says:

    Love that we have an anatomy guru here on Elephant Yoga! Thanks David!!

    Posting to Elephant Yoga on Facebook and Twitter.

    Tanya Lee Markul, Yoga Editor
    Join us! Like Elephant Yoga on Facebook
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  5. Tanya Lee Markul Tanya Lee Markul says:

    And….

    Just posted to "Featured Today" on the Elephant Yoga homepage.

    Tanya Lee Markul, Yoga Editor
    Join us! Like Elephant Yoga on Facebook
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  6. Thanks for this! As a new yoga teacher struggling with anatomy and physiology (hmmmm…what exactly is the difference between anatomy and physiology? Gonna have to google that…), it's good to find mental warm-ups like this at Elephant.

  7. David says:

    Look at that, as it turns out… Anatomy can be simple and interesting at the same time. So happy to share with all the elephants in the room!

  8. Anouscka says:

    Finally some good yoga indepth stufff. More More More please!!!!!

  9. [...] The ‘Almighty’ Psoas Muscle: Your Body’s Center of Movement. ~ David Keil [...]

  10. Jill Barth Jill Barth says:

    So very helpful. It's true that we build up a false impression of our bodies (anatomy & physiology) and this type of explanation and illustration breaks that misunderstanding away. Keep it coming!

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