The Largest Driver of Climate Change. {Video}

Via on Jun 10, 2012
http://www.flickr.com/photos/theknowlesgallery/6261785869/sizes/m/in/photostream/
Photo: The Knowles Gallery

It’s the other inconvenient truth.

The intersection of land use, food and environment is an incredible global issue.

Demand for food is skyrocketing. As a result, agriculture has become the largest driver of climate change, biodiversity loss and environmental destruction. Agriculture uses 40% of our earth’s land surface and accounts for 70% of water use. At TEDx Twin Cities, Jonathan Foley shows why we desperately need to begin “terraculture”—farming for the whole planet.

Jonathan Foley discusses the complex environmental systems and their affects on society. His computer models have shown the deep impact agriculture is having on our planet. Watch this video to learn how Jonathan suggests we tackle this problem as the need for agriculture grows.

~ Like elephant green on facebook. ~

About Lynn Hasselberger

Lynn Hasselberger lives in Chicagoland with her son, husband and two cats. She loves sunrises, running, yoga, chocolate, and NYR, and has a voracious appetite for comedy. In her spare time, she blogs at myEARTH360.com and LynnHasselberger.com. A "Green Diva" and social media addict, you'll most likely find Lynn on twitter (@LynnHasselbrgr & @myEARTH360) and facebook. She hopes to make the world a better place, have more fun, re-develop her math skills and overcome her fear of public speaking. Like her writing? Subscribe to her posts.

605 views

5 Responses to “The Largest Driver of Climate Change. {Video}”

  1. [...] Climate change has added an entirely new dimension to weather speak and can elicit angry debate or bring a conversation to an abrubt end. [...]

  2. [...] practicing outdoors you can establish your link to the environment. You can feel how inseparable you are from [...]

  3. [...] Naturally, we are all at home on Mother Earth, though sometimes we don’t act like it. [...]

  4. [...] price of corn, which is used to feed livestock and for biofuels, hit a record high in August. Even as the U.S. East Coast was hammered by rain, drought conditions [...]

  5. [...] of us blame automotive and industrial emissions for pollution, climate change and global warming, livestock farming actually generates more greenhouse gas emissions than all transport combined, according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture [...]

Leave a Reply