Top 5 Laments of the Dying—Pure Heartdust.

Via on Dec 31, 2012

As we come into the wake of a new year some of us may seek to reflect, some of us to forget.

But how many of us actually think about death? It’s finality, it beauty, it possibilities?

Before you go running for the hills there’s something really beautiful about this topic I would like to share with you. In Tibetan Buddhism it’s considered to be a sacred time for it is a point where achieving enlightenment is possible.

So rather that the consideration of death be a remorseful act, it is a wholly positive one.

Could there by any better way to experience our final bow?

Death
Photo: Doug88888

When my grandmother was dying in the hospital my relatives did everything to avoid her other-worldly gaze. Fear was everywhere. In her eyes, in their hearts, steeped in the ether of that room.

What a sad way to go. She had nine children, gave her whole life to raising them to be left alone when she most needed someone to simply hold her hand and be.

That regret is now my regret but thankfully I am blessed with the opportunity of life to do something about it. For the gift of choice is still in my earthly hands as it is yours. And by that I mean I have a choice to always live by my truth.

If I need something I will ask for it. If I don’t like something I will express it. If I long for something I will admit it and work towards it.

Truth serves all for when we’re honest with people they naturally trust us more and we them.

What do you choose for yourself for 2013?

We have so much to learn from our elders and this list that I came across of their top five regrets when dying is pure heartdust. Learning from the mistakes of others leaves us with more energy to walk an authentic path.

Heartwisdom
Photo: carlosporto

This list was compiled by a palliative care nurse Bonnie Ware who spent several years working with people in their final 12 weeks of life.

Let’s make their laments our greatest treasures as we use them to guide ourselves towards a journey of deeper meaning—down a path that leads us to the wisdom and beauty of our individual and unique hearts.

And celebrate, dear ones. Celebrate your own awakening to greatness, to choice, as the clock chimes this midnight hour to come.

1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.

2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.

3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.

4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.

5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.

Happy true year!

Ed: Lynn H.

Like elephant spirituality on facebook.

About Lisa Tully

Lisa Tully ditched the corporate world a few years back and headed to India on her last few sheckles. She had a burning desire to see the Dalai Lama in person and learn from him. Blown away by the Tibetan culture she was simultaneously overwhelmed by profound inspiration for what she should do for her next job incarnation! Fast-forward past some serious doubts, the odd flood of tears, and nothing short of a few miracles—she now runs successful spiritual group tours to Dharamsala & Ladakh in Northern India plus the magical kingdom of Bhutan. Lisa loves nothing more than to take folks to experience the exact same life-changing trips she did. Visit her site & join the adventures!

1,179 views

Appreciate this article? Support indie media!

(We use super-secure PayPal - but don't worry - you don't need an account with PayPal.)

2 Responses to “Top 5 Laments of the Dying—Pure Heartdust.”

  1. Vanessa says:

    beautifully written.

Leave a Reply