“The Dalai Lama’s views on gay sex.”

Via Waylon Lewis
on May 28, 2012
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Dalai Lama has thrown his considerable moral weight behind gay marriage, condemning homophobia and saying sex was fine as long as it was consensual.”

The Dalai Lama’s views on gay sex: “If two males or two females voluntarily agree to have mutual satisfaction without further implication of harming others, then it is okay.”

 

 

“If two people — a couple — really feel that way is more practical, more sort of satisfaction, both sides fully agree, then okay.”

We are all equally possessed of fundamental human goodness.

The tradition of Buddhism (I’m Buddhist, this is what I’ve been taught) is this:

“Always trust the principle one.” Meaning, trust your own judgment before any outside (theistic) wisdom.

“Do not follow what I say. Only do what I say if it meets your experience.” ~ Buddha

Dalai Lama: “If Buddhism and science conflict, we go with Science.”

I don’t have the exact quotes, but that’s the gist.

The Dalai Lama’s views on homosexuality.

Excerpt from Wikipedia:

In his discussions of the traditional Buddhist view on appropriate sexual behavior, he explains the concept of “right organ in the right object at the right time,” which historically has been interpreted as indicating that oral, manual and anal sex (both homosexual and heterosexual) are not appropriate in Buddhism or for Buddhists, yet he also says that in modern times all common, consensual sexual practices that do not cause harm to others are ethically acceptable and that society should not discriminate against gays and lesbians and should accept and respect them from a secular point of view.[75] In a 1994 interview with OUT Magazine, the Dalai Lama clarified his personal opinion on the matter by saying, “If someone comes to me and asks whether homosexuality is okay or not, I will ask ‘What is your companion’s opinion?’. If you both agree, then I think I would say, ‘If two males or two females voluntarily agree to have mutual satisfaction without further implication of harming others, then it is okay.'”[76]

In his 1996 book Beyond Dogma, he described a traditional Buddhist definition of an appropriate sexual act as follows: “A sexual act is deemed proper when the couples use the organs intended for sexual intercourse and nothing else… Homosexuality, whether it is between men or between women, is not improper in itself. What is improper is the use of organs already defined as inappropriate for sexual contact.”[77]

He elaborated in 1997, explaining that the basis of that teaching was unknown to him and acknowledging that “some of the teachings may be specific to a particular cultural and historic context,” while clarifying the historical Buddhist position (in contrast with his personal opinion) by saying, “Buddhist sexual proscriptions ban homosexual activity and heterosexual sex through orifices other than the vagina, including masturbation or other sexual activity with the hand… From a Buddhist point of view, lesbian and gay sex is generally considered sexual misconduct”. Nonetheless, he reiterated, Buddhism calls for respect, compassion, and equal treatment for all, including homosexuals.[78]

[With thanks to Reddit for the heads up on this. Many of his public statements of tolerance go back to (at least) his 1994 interview with Out Magazine, so he is not late to the civil rights/tolerance cause]

Say these every morning:


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About Waylon Lewis

Waylon Lewis, founder of elephant magazine, now elephantjournal.com & host of Walk the Talk Show with Waylon Lewis, is a 1st generation American Buddhist “Dharma Brat." Voted #1 in U.S. on twitter for #green two years running, Changemaker & Eco Ambassador by Treehugger, Green Hero by Discovery’s Planet Green, Best (!) Shameless Self-Promoter at Westword's Web Awards, Prominent Buddhist by Shambhala Sun, & 100 Most Influential People in Health & Fitness 2011 by "Greatist", Waylon is a mediocre climber, lazy yogi, 365-day bicycle commuter & best friend to Redford (his rescue hound). His aim: to bring the good news re: "the mindful life" beyond the choir & to all those who didn't know they gave a care. elephantjournal.com | His first book, Things I would like to do with You, is now available.

Comments

64 Responses to ““The Dalai Lama’s views on gay sex.””

  1. […] mention the gays though. Sad […]

  2. Peter says:

    I'm Buddhist and I am also gay, and whilst I see where you are coming from, I must say that The Dalai Lama does not represent all Buddhists, he is a teacher of Tibetan Buddhism. Yes, he may be a Leader and he may have some power to change a few peoples views, but he is still a Non-Christian, Non-Muslim, Non-Catholic etc teacher, his words will mean little or nothing to a majority of the people who follow those faiths, Tibetan Buddhists only make up a small percentage of Buddhists.

    As for the hype, though we may have differing ideologies, I deeply respect the man, you may find his stance on Homosexuality disappointing, but that does not retract the good he has spread in the world, if you actually took the time to study this man you would understand why he is popular with many people in the world. If you want change, then why not go out and do something to bring it about, it is easy to point out apparent flaws in others and yet disregard our own, he is a teacher but he is one man like you and I, we are both capable of helping others, he is neither greater or better than any other human on this Earth, we all have the power to help make the world a better place. “An act to make another happy, inspires the other to make still another happy, and so happiness is aroused and abounds. Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of the single candle will not be shortened."

    Speaking on behalf of myself and the other Buddhists I know, we share the same view on Homosexuality as we do Heterosexuality, as long as it is between two consensual adults who are in a loving relationship it is completely acceptable, what we find immoral or "wrong/sinful" is promiscuity, whether you are gay or straight. We show respect and compassion to all not the select few.

  3. Robert A. says:

    Lets not forget that the Dalai Lama's form of Buddhism is unique to Tibetans and does not, in any way, represent any official stance from a buddhist perspective. Tibetan Buddhism, in particular, if filled with many unique cultural traditions, ritual and folkways not found in any other form of Buddhism.

    The Buddha taught one thing and one thing only: suffering and the release from suffering. Many of these questions are inconsequential to the path of ending one's suffering and working towad enlightenment.

  4. anthony tran says:

    I believe Buddhism is a religion. however the strictness of it varies on how dedicated you are. there really no pressure. if you can handle to a certain amount of strictnesss you stop at whatever level your comfortable with. you just try your best. so really there is no strictness at all becuase you just do all you can. and about "the same closed minded mentality as those taught in Catholic school". if you study budhism well you know that it isn't close minded at all. its rather open to other ideas and thought process. as budhha said before he died he only taught a small fraction of what he knows, so always try to listen and learn new ideas and theories. throw away the rubbish and take the good. Buddha also taught us to never hold on to his word or anything for that matter. he even said I've said nothing in 48 years of teaching (obliviously a metaphor) . that why buddhism can be so adaptive because the whole point of buddhism is doing the right thing and becoming enlightened. Buddhism is so flexible and adaptive depending on environment I highly doubt its a close minded, strict religion. if it is, its not Buddhism that close minded, instead its the Buddhist practitioner that your getting your information from that close minded.

  5. Pratit Gurung says:

    To be precise, the goal of Buddhism is to find true happiness, to be enlightened and be free from 'Samsara'. Please, check wikipedia if you do not know what 'Samsara' means.The goal here is to be free from all samsaric desires, defilements and attachments…to shed what is not real and realize what is real…to realize the ultimate truth. Buddhists believe in the middle way. We neither support nor discourage or judge homosexuality.As long as the act is consensual, non violent and hurts anybody(including yourself;which is very very important!) in any way whatsoever, we do not judge or say our way is the highway. We believe in equality, respect and compassion and once again the main purpose of a Buddhist practitioner is to be free from Samsara and rescue others from Samsara if you are willing to do so as a Boddhisattwa.

  6. Jen says:

    It just seems you try and find things that fit your opinions- is there no absolute truth? I am not Buddist, but seems you leave shen you cant create a religion.

  7. Kate says:

    I think the Dalai Lama knows the difference between his personal views but has ensured that they do not conflict with his overall message of tolerance. While his generation and culture are as a whole going to be less understanding and supportive of homosexuality, he is more concerned with finding peace and tolerance in the world than giving into his own personal aversions.

  8. mrchokeys says:

    I remain astounded that people are still obsessed with other people's sex lives. Unless one is invited to participate, or wishes to participate in the act, it should not be a matter of concern. Unsatisfied with their own obsession, they must ask a spiritual teacher (not a sexual research scientist) whether their own reaction is justified by doctrine, and supported by authority. It is such a profound, and convoluted viewpoint; a hall of mirrors – if it's not something that you would want to do, or believe should be done, than don't do it – leave it at that. Manifestations of consensual adult sexuality all have healthy and dysfunctional aspects, without regard to the gender or sexual orientation of those involved.

  9. Tanukisan says:

    The Dalai Lama is entitled to his views, but he does not speak for all Buddhists. Tibetan Buddhism is only one school; there are others in which sexual misconduct is seen only as sexual acts which do not involve mutual consent, which involve coercion, or which are between partners clearly unequal in terms of power relations. Essentially, those schools see the sexual act as mutually consensual and pleasurable, and ideally the ultimate expression of love between two people, regardless of gender. If the Dalai Lama thinks otherwise, then perhaps he still has some things to learn.

  10. Cristian Lang says:

    Good point, although there is some truth in looking at religions and at least on the relative level judging them… by their founders, not their followers. So how was the founder of Islam. What about the founders of Christianity or Buddhism? What about Jainism? Absolutely, the real nature of beings and phenomena is beyond judgement and concept, but relatively it may be useful NOT to go certain paths… How can we know which not? Look at the FOUNDERS! Look at their lives!

  11. Cristian Lang says:

    Science is modern nihilistic religion led by the greed for money, power and fame.

  12. Cristian Lang says:

    Tibetan Buddhism is… Five schools, not just one! As HH also accepted the Bon school as being Buddhist. How much more compassion does one want from the Dalai Lama? He even practices Dzogchen, which in his school (Gelugpa) had been seen as heresy by many… Look up Dzogchen, it is the peak of all Tibetan teachings, and was taught also in the previously non-Buddhist Bon school…

  13. JZN says:

    Thank you for being here on earth with me. :3

  14. JZN says:

    To clarify Waylon, Do you mean pick a new religion? Or help update your religion to the modern times through your peaceful observance of it? (The Dalai Lama seems to be attempting the second one, as mayhaps even the Pope was for Catholicism in recent ventures and sayings…)

    Just wondering what you truly meant there. :p

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