3.3
January 9, 2013

Love is Louder Than Self-Harm: A 13-year-old’s Anti-Suicide Letter.

*Note from the author: The following post about suicide was written by a young teenage girl in my family who cares deeply about those who suffer from depression. She has started to write about the effects of depression and pain that so many young and older people feel, and also writes a blog about many of the issues that effect teens, including bullying. She has chosen to remain anonymous for now, but hopes that her writing may inspire others.

 

We must remember those who took their own lives.

We must remember them as they were either bullied, suffered too much, hated themselves, had no friends or family or lived without food or shelter.

Or anything.

Today is the day to respect those people; every forty seconds in this country, someone attempts to kill themselves.

Please help those in need.

If you ever see someone being treated badly by other people, stand up for them, because eventually it can get to them and they might take their own life.

Suicide is very, very, very serious and most people think it is a horrible and selfish thing to do, but people have their reasons.

That person could have felt so alone—so alone that they could have put all their pain, misery and anger upon themselves, because of it.

They scream, but you can’t hear them because their screams are silent.

That person could have cried each night because of what they have gone through and no one could have known.

Be nice to everyone, because someone might be holding a deep, deep secret that is eating them from the inside out.

A lot of people say, “Get over it and just be happy already. It’s not that hard.”

Well, to those who have depression, it is very hard.

It’s hard to have depression.

Imagine if you were blamed for having cancer; you just cant “get over” it.

You can’t just get over depression. It’s like an illness. And it drives people crazy.

It feels like getting trapped in a spider web…not knowing how to get out…because once you’re depressed, it takes so much to get happy.

If you have a friend who is depressed, don’t be impatient.

It’s not their fault.

Help them…cheer them up.

Because when you’re that depressed, you can become suicidal.

And another thing…

If you see a person who is hurting themselves, do not point at them, point them out, or or make fun of them for it.

A lot of people who harm themselves do it to take the pain from deep inside of them to the surface so they don’t feel so bottled up inside.

You can’t just tell someone to stop cutting or harming themselves and expect them to stop.

It’s like an addiction and it often leads to suicide.

When a person is hurting themselves, they get into a mode where depression takes over.

Where voices in their head tell them to go deeper and cut more or burn more and more and more until…

Well, you die.

If you know someone who is depressed or hurts themselves, help them!

Don’t just tell them to stop because that’s not going to work.

So…

Help those in need, because we can’t all be that strong.

 

 

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Ed: Bryonie Wise

 

 

 

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Francesca Biller

Francesca Biller is an award-winning investigative journalist who has written, reported, and covered news and features about politics, culture, race, family issues, and culture for more than 20 years. While her career began as a print reporter and columnist for newspapers and magazines, Biller turned her passion also to news broadcast reporting for public radio, wherein she produced documentary reports for which she received The Edward R. Murrow Award, two Golden Mike Awards, and three Society of Professional Journalists Awards for Best Series Reporting, Documentary Series, and Live Radio Reporting. Currently, she is writing two books for publication with Zorba Press which includes stories and prose about her Japanese and Russian background and cultural identity discoveries.