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June 12, 2016

June 14-26: Mayan Calendar Calls for 13 Days of Creativity, Joy & Introspection.

Photo: Flickr Commons

*Eleditor’s note: Astrology isn’t a religion. We’re not sure it’s a science, either. It’s magic, maybe. But, as with feng shui, say, things affect things. So as long as we don’t go blaming our problems on the stars, as long as we assume responsibility for our own actions…well, hell, a little auspicious coincidence and applicable wisdom can’t hurt. And so, with that grain of salt…enjoy!

“You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.” ~ Maya Angelou

I live in the heart of the Mayan highlands in Guatemala.

The more I study the Mayan Calendar, the more astonished I am by the wise precision of this ancient system. Although it has incredible intricacy, it is also available for study by laypeople and offers everyday guidance even in the 21st century, in our ultra-present time.

The Maya view time as both linear and cyclical. Intricate mathematics are woven into their calendar systems that stretch into infinity. Time is both now and forever.

“Mayan weeks” are 13-day cycles called trecenas.

Here are the basics of how the Mayan lunar calendar works. There are 20 day signs (nahuales) in all, which cycle in the same order. Each day sign is paired with a number from one to 13, and each number has unique significance.

Every day of the Gregorian calendar corresponds to a Mayan calendar day with a sign and a number. The Mayan day sign and number from your birthday are your personal day sign and number. I am 6 Kej (Deer), for example. My partner is 2 Kan (Snake). Today is 11 Q’anil (Seed). (Note: I use the terms and spellings in K’iche’ Maya. In classical/Mexican system, the day sign is called Chuen.)

The Mayan solar day 1 B’atz’ is on Tuesday, June 14.

From then until June 26, we are moving through the trecena ruled by B’atz’: the thread of life. Its animal totem is the monkey. These days are superb for expressing our creativity with lighthearted glee.

Dance. Sing. Paint. Write. Above all, play.

“Every artist dips his brush in his own soul, and paints his own nature into his pictures.” ~ Henry Ward Beecher

According to The Serpent and the Jaguar by Birgitte Rasine, on B’atz’ days, the Maya “express their intention to freely receive all that they have requested from the universe, and to be able to unravel or resolve any matter of issue, especially family problems.” These days are “extremely auspicious for all artistic works and endeavors; in fact, it is a powerful day to begin any project.”

“The world is but a canvas to the imagination.” ~ Henry David Thoreau

Another aspect of B’atz’ has to do with looking at the cycles, habits and repeating patterns in our lives.

The thread of life refers to time. Ancient Mayan artifacts depicted the Goddess Ixchel weaving the cosmos on her backstrap loom. In fact, the elements of the loom, weaving procedures, designs and the weaver herself are all part of the Maya vision of birthing and the Cosmos.

“We sleep, but the loom of life never stops, and the pattern which was weaving when the sun went down is weaving when it comes up in the morning.” ~ Henry Ward Beecher

By paying attention to the patterns in our lives, we can eventually get to the root of things and uproot unwanted or harmful habit-patterns. This, in turn, creates space for our natural creativity to flow and flourish.

“When we engage in what we are naturally suited to do, our work takes on the quality of play and it is play that stimulates creativity.” ~ Linda Naiman

This trecena is also a great time to let go of inferiority and superiority. No need to compare—just be you.

“We will discover the nature of our particular genius when we stop trying to conform to our own and other’s people’s models, learn to be ourselves and allow our natural channel to open.” ~ Shakti Gawain

Here’s to embodying the delight, creativity and curiosity of the monkey and exploring the multitude of patterns we’ve woven into the colorful tapestry of our lives.

Relephant:

Author: Michelle Margaret Fajkus

Image: flickr/Bansky

Editors: Ashleigh Hitchcock; Renee Picard

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Michelle Margaret Fajkus  |  59 Follower