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August 28, 2019

How to move through the Discomfort of Letting Go.

 

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Focusing on what is most important to us is a living practice.

It is a practice because to get results we must stick with what is important to us (family, building a company, reading that book, or, maybe, a relationship) even when it gets uncomfortable—most importantly when it gets uncomfortable.

So, as we take ownership, prioritize our values, and set our intention on creating something new or making changes, our mind will have a lot to say about the old stuff that is falling away—the old stuff that we no longer have our attention and energy on. Meaning as we shift our attention to the new thing, we inevitably must shift our attention away from something else—the old thing that used to be important to us.

As we shift our attention away from the old thing, it will feel like we are starting to lose control of it, which essentially, we are. The purpose is to let go of attempting to influence everything and instead put our attention on what is important to us, the new thing.

This experience of losing perceived control of something can evoke enough discomfort to have us revert to our old ways and abandon what is most important to us.

So, as we resolve to make our mark and leave our legacy in this world, remember that the old will always fall away, and it will be uncomfortable. Knowing this ahead of time will help us stay committed when discomfort comes.

Discomfort is a part of growth, and sometimes it is the letting go that seems more challenging than the pushing forward.

Letting go is where true freedom lives, and sometimes fulfilling our dreams and wishes means being willing to change the way we do things—even if the old way has produced good results in the past.

It is our responsibility to become skilled in keeping the essential elements of what has worked best while being willing to release things that were once good but are now holding us back (relationships, business strategies, or any part of life that isn’t working for us).

A question to ask today could be, what is it time for me to stop doing that has served me a great deal, and now is holding me back?

Hearing the answer is one thing, taking action on the answer is the part that requires responsibility.

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author: Nancy Sheridan

Image: Author's Own

Editor: Michelle Gean