Pasasana: It’s What’s Cookin’ in David Garrigues’ Asana Kitchen.

Via on Jan 19, 2012

Greetings,

I would like to introduce you to my Asana Kitchen series. The Asana Kitchen was created to provide a platform for my students to ask questions and receive thorough answers from me.  I choose the asana based on how many students have asked the question.  The questions I receive about asana come from beginning to advanced students which is why I have a range of different level students represented in the videos.

One of the most asked about asana is PASASANA. The first pose of the Intermediate Series and very tricky for all levels of practitioner. I hope this video, and the notes which follow, will help guide you through the progression of the asana and also help you think about the asana and the beginning of the Second Series in a unique way.

 

 

 

 

1) Establish a Grounded, Immoveable Foundation

Balancing in a full squatting position is one of the most important and challenging aspects to this posture. The feet are your foundation, they are directly in contact with the earth. Organize your posture directly over this foundation noticing when/if you are either too far behind or in front of your foundation. Start by planting the feet while feeling the support of the arches. Squat all the way down. Close the knee joints entirely. Lower the hips, touch buttocks to the backs of the lower legs. Orient your squat directly over your feet. If you have any difficulty squatting you will feel unstable when you squat as though the hips are too heavy, that they drag you down and back. You may want to lift up the heels. But instead elevate your heels with just enough height to truly balance on the feet as you feel your hips, torso and head align more clearly over this foundation. When you feel stable, centered and immoveable in your squat, then you are ready for the next step.

2) Remember the Twist
As you develop and refine how you work in the posture remember to return your orientation to the twist along the central axis. Study the rotation of the torso in order to study the middle channel. Remember that part of creating a satisfying twist is in becoming receptive, especially within the torso and spinal area. And so position yourself to receive the action of turning the spine, and endeavor to rotate your spine more evenly from base to crown. Notice the inner refinement that can take place along shushumna, the middle pranic axis.
3) Position of the feet/knees

To make the posture easier place one foot or knee slightly forward of the other. If you are twisting to the left you can facilitate the twist to the left by moving the right foot and/or knee forward of the left. This also brings the right hip forward of the left hip and thus makes twisting to the left easier. For some of you this will serve to clarify the central axis, and give you more freedom in a certain direction to twist, and will help establish a more stable, grounded foundation. Your posture and twist will not be served If you are too strict and insist on keeping the feet/knees together or the heels down.
But for others keeping the feet and knees more together will help you to hone in on the vertical axis and improve the feeling of the rotation. In each case you want to continue to refine your sense of the breath, cultivate an awareness of the actions and the resulting counter actions along the glorious axis set in motion by the breath, and observe how that awareness leads to intelligence in your asana.

4) The Energetic Chain of The Noose

At one point in the video, using Rob as the model, I trace what I call an ‘energetic chain’ formed by the upper back, shoulders, arms and connected hands (the parts of the body that form the ‘noose’ that give the posture its name) Rob was twisting to the right and I used my hands to trace the energetic chain in a counter clockwise direction. But what I didn’t mention was that the direction of the chain that I indicated in the video was actually the more subtle counter loop. If you are twisting to the right, first try experiencing a clockwise direction to the energetic chain formed by the loop of the upper torso, arms, and hands. And afterwards experiment with a counter clockwise direction to the loop.

 

Enjoy!

If you have a question about an asana you can email the ASANA KITCHEN!  asanakitchen@gmail.com

Hari Om,
David

 

About David Garrigues

David Garrigues is an international yoga teacher. He is recognized as one of a few teachers in the US certified to teach Ashtanga Yoga by the late world renown yoga master Sri K Pattabhi Jois. As an Ashtanga Ambassador he bases his teachings on the idea that 'Anyone can take practice', a core idea in the teachings of Sri K Pattabhi Jois. David's mission is to help others flourish within the living, contemporary lineage of Ashtanga Yoga. He aims to be part of an ever wider circle of people who are committed to applying the teachings of ashtanga yoga in ways that promote physical, psychological, and spiritual growth in themselves and others. David's website and highly popular youtube video channel, Asana Kitchen, has a wealth of free, expert yoga instructional materials to inspire progress in beginner through advanced practitioners. He is the author of three Ashtanga Yoga dvd's, A Guide to the Primary Series, A Guide to the Ashtanga Yoga Pranayama Sequence, and A Guide to the Second Series. His book Vayu Siddhi: A Guide to Free Breathing was written and inspired by yogic sacred texts on the science of asana and pranayama, the two favorite subjects of students of ashtanga yoga. He is the director of the Ashtanga Yoga School of Philadelphia and the Ashtanga Yoga School of Kovalam in India.

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4 Responses to “Pasasana: It’s What’s Cookin’ in David Garrigues’ Asana Kitchen.”

  1. Thaddeus1 says:

    Thanks so much for the great insights. Can't wait to see what you will be cookin' in the kitchen in the future.

    Posting to Elephant Ashtanga. Like Elephant Ashtanga on Facebook.

  2. Tanya Lee Markul says:

    Thank you for sharing this!!

    Just posted to "Featured Today" on the Elephant Yoga homepage.

    Posting to Elephant Yoga on Facebook and Twitter.

    Tanya Lee Markul, Yoga Editor
    Like Elephant Yoga on Facebook
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  3. Hi David! It's nice to see you here on elephant journal. This is a really phenomenal article — than you for sharing! I am a vinyasa yoga teacher and ashtanga practitioner that moved to Philadelphia a few months ago and have been meaning to make it out to the ashtanga center! I'm in the mainline/Roxborough area so it is tough to make it out there so early in the day. Nevertheless, I hope to meet you soon.

    your fellow elephant,
    Lauren

  4. [...] Pasasana: It’s What’s Cookin’ in David Garrigues’ Asana Kitchen. ~ David Garrigues [...]

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