Geek vs. Hipster.

Via Kate Bartolotta
on Apr 7, 2012
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Geeks vs Hipsters

So where do you fall on the Geek to Hipster Continuum?

“Hipsters never say they are hipsters.”

I never say I’m a hipster, but I do love Bon Iver and have a favorite t-shirt with a pink poodle that I wear “ironically.” (But I’m also sort of a geek insomuch as I can explain the meaning of irony to you in great detail. And because I just used the word “insomuch”). Definitely more into thrift stores and art than video games, but I can be a sucker for old-school sci-fi. How ’bout it? Geek? Hipster? Or somewhere in between?


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About Kate Bartolotta

Kate Bartolotta is a wellness cheerleader, yogini storyteller, and self-care maven. She also writes for Huffington Post, Yoga International, Mantra Yoga+ Health, a beauty full mind, The Good Men Project, The Green Divas, The Body Project, Project Eve, Thought Catalog and Soulseeds. Kate's books are now available on and Barnes & She is passionate about helping people fall in love with their lives. You can connect with Kate on Facebook and Instagram.


3 Responses to “Geek vs. Hipster.”

  1. nathan says:

    i laughed so hard… this is phenomenal. Thank you so much!

  2. Hannah says:

    you can tell very obviously that this infographic is more biased towards geeks than hipsters. It portrays hipsters in a much more negative light using words like "dismissive" "detritus" "reject" "prowling" and "ignorant". Where the geek culture side uses words like "authentic" "genuine" "expertise" "love" "need" "adopt". I mean even the fact that they have drawn the geek with a smiley face and the hipster with a frowney face is obvious in how they want to portray each caricature.

    You know it is perfectly acceptable for someone to love the lord of the rings and also to love anything by wes anderson. or to have watched every series of star trek in its entirety and to listen to neutral milk hotel on repeat. being a geek and being a hipster according to your "definitions" aren't mutually exclusive.

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