The Little Things in Life Shouldn’t Be Wished Away.

Via on Jan 31, 2013

What to my wondering eyes should appear ...

I can’t explain the way a really wonderful song makes me feel.

Alive. Inspired. Sad.

I literally get goose-bumps from a powerful tune that touches me.

I can’t explain the way I feel when my daughter smiles at me.

Alive. In love. Soulful.

There are some things in life that touch me deeply, on a level where words typically fail.

These are the things that make life worth living.

Still, life is the daily motions of plugging along and getting through each minute.

Standing in line. Being somewhere when you’d rather be somewhere else. Having too much on your plate.

Yet when I stop and really think about what it is I’m rushing around for—where my impatience with the actual, physical process of living my life stems from—I never have a good enough reason.

Then I think about the moments in my life when I’ve been truly happy. Again, happy or touched on a level that’s difficult to even convey. These moments are small.

Sure, my wedding day is up there, and the birth of my daughter was miraculous, of course; but it’s the tiny things that happen while I’m waiting in line—like the sincere smile my daughter gave the cashier when she handed her a sticker. These moments are the root of my internal feeling of satisfaction.

Heart

So what am I rushing for? What am I rushing to? Death? The next line?

Why do I want to be somewhere else?

Example: I’m participating in a teacher training right now and finding it extremely challenging to be apart from my toddler. The thing is though, I’ve been dying to take this training, and I deserve to enjoy it—and my daughter deserves a mother who stays in the present moment because otherwise I’d miss the kiss she gives me when she’s sitting on my lap and I’m reading Mr. Brown Can Moo! to her for the hundredth time; I’d miss that if I was ignoring her and making a “necessary” phone call instead.

So what’s my point? Where am I going with this?

Remember that every single time you wish a less-than-perfect life moment away you’re by default wishing away those other “nothing” moments that make up your meaningful existence. Those sweet smiles and connections—they happen on an infinitesimally small scale too.

Life can give us goosebumps, and it can give us headaches, and I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t want it any other way.

 

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Ed: Brianna Bemel

About Jennifer S. White

Jennifer is a voracious reader, obsessive writer, passionate yoga instructor and drinker of hoppy ales. She's also a devoted mama and wife (a stay-at-home yogi). She considers herself to be one of the funniest people that ever lived and she's also an identical twin. In addition to her work on elephant journal, Jennifer has over 40 articles published on the wellness website MindBodyGreen and her yoga-themed column Your Personal Yogi ran in the newspaper Toledo Free Press. She holds a Bachelor's degree in geology, absolutely no degrees in anything related to literature, and she currently owns a wheel of cheese. If you want to learn more about Jennifer then make sure to check out her writing, as she's finally put her tendencies to over-think and over-share to good use. Jennifer's first book, The Best Day of Your Life, is now available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram and on her website.

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One Response to “The Little Things in Life Shouldn’t Be Wished Away.”

  1. [...] 4. Yoga. As one of my teachers said to me this weekend, practicing yoga is practicing connecting what you’re thinking with what you’re doing. If you’re driving your car, you’re thinking about driving your car. Trust me, all of us need to practice this. Why? Because we’ll get more fulfillment out of what we’re doing, and because there’s so much joy in the little things that we miss when we let our minds wander. [...]

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