2.8
October 15, 2010

The Genesis of Agloves.

Gloves for a touch-screen world.

Before Agloves, runners, cyclists, walkers, commuters could be seen biting off their gloves and shoving them into pockets just in time to miss a phone call.

A Boulder, Colorado artist wasn’t willing to use a sausage to answer her iPhone this winter.

Jennifer Spencer, a 51-year-old avid runner, yogi, and complainer of cold hands, answered her phone with her nose last winter after finding that gloved hands failed to answer the touch screen iPhone.  She had even contemplated using sausages.

“I just needed a pair of gloves that worked for my iPhone when it’s cold,” said Spencer, the founder of Agloves, whose company just launched at the end of September.

So chuck the sausages.

Agloves are snug-fitting knit gloves that work with extreme accuracy and precision on any touch screen devices including iPods, iPhones, Androids and the like.

The secret is in the gloves’ (literal) silver lining. Each pair of gloves is intricately webbed with silver-and-nylon threads, which make the gloves effectively conductive.

“Contrary to popular belief, touch screens and iPhones aren’t heat-sensitive,” Spencer said.  Instead, touch screens are capacitive.

Memo to non-science-y folks: capacitive devices require small electrical currents from hands to activate the device. Silver is conductive. A conductive element, such as silver, allows electrical currents to pass. Thus, Agloves’ use your hand’s own natural electrical charge to operate the device.

“And voila! We’ve finally got something that works,” said Spencer, who’s been demo-ing the gloves across the country and telling people she (g)loves them.

Before Agloves, runners, cyclists, walkers, commuters could be seen biting off their gloves and shoving them into pockets just in time to miss a phone call.

Now, runners, cyclists, walkers and commuters can not only answer their phone with gloved hands, but text! Or scroll, or play games, or type on their devices with perfect accuracy.

As we head into winter, there are several gloves that market themselves as the iPhone gloves: Gaspar Gloves, The North Face Etip Gloves, and Freehands to name a few.  Some settle for only two- or three-fingers that work on the touch screen. Others aren’t warm.

Agloves have 10-finger capacity, are warm, and are soft and comfortable.

elephant is reviewing Agloves right now—our review is coming this week. So far, so good—they’re soft, comfy, elegant. and surprisingly affordable—where your average normal glove is say $25, these Agloves are $18.

To purchase or learn more, click here.

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