Why Women Spend so Much Money on Lululemon, Discovered.

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I’m not a woman, and don’t buy yoga clothes. So I’ll just skip the profound observations and get to excerpting and linking this article that manages to directly contradict itself:

Introduction:

Every day, women spend hundreds of dollars on clothes they plan to wear only while sweating –- sports bras, yoga pants, skin-tight “breathable” tanks. But why?Business Insider reports that it’s all about the way that retailers like Lululemon market their apparel … to appeal to women’s insecurities.

Conclusion:

…a young woman says: “My boyfriend and I were going on vacation. We talked about getting a diamond, but with all the ThankYou Points I’ve been earning, I flew us to the rock I really had in mind.” The rock she “really had in mind” happens to be a giant rock formation near Moab, Utah. As HuffPost’s Katie Bindley wrote: “The new commercials sell women the cars and financial products they can now afford by presenting those big ticket items as tools for celebrating their independence rather than attracting a husband.” Advertisers are learning that the way to women’s wallets is acknowledging their strengths rather than exploiting their weaknesses, and by focusing on this demographic, Lululemon, intentionally or not, is appealing in part to their awareness of their own power — earning power.

Read the rest over at Huff Post, it’s worth it.

 

 

 

~

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anonymous May 1, 2013 10:33pm

[…] […]

anonymous Nov 28, 2012 10:50am

[…] lines leading like the Winchester House, to nowhere. You know you will never find them in an expensive department […]

anonymous Sep 23, 2012 8:58am

[…] they intruded on, but I’ve rarely seen this succeed when classes are filled with people wearing lululemon and prices are unaffordable to […]

anonymous Aug 7, 2012 1:52pm

[…] […]

anonymous May 16, 2012 5:05pm

[…] imagine, the fact that larger/taller people spend more money for well-fitted apparel is absolutely well known. For myself, I’ve banned my 1995 apparel and […]

anonymous May 11, 2012 4:24am

[…] in Silver Lake, a hip suburb of Los Angeles—a world of sunshine, palm trees, pink bicycles, and designer yoga clothes. “When I sat down to write as Rain Mitchell, I did feel like a different person,” says […]

anonymous Apr 16, 2012 9:13am

the irony is that most of their pants give me cameltoe! lol 🙂 oh well….

anonymous Apr 15, 2012 7:40pm

The days are over, were you just go to the store and buy white fruit of the loom t-shirts for a couple bucks. Then wear them for several years until there are so many holes in them, that you have to go buy another package.

anonymous Apr 13, 2012 7:35pm

LLL wears, washes, and works out better than any others. I've worked out in cotton, blends, cheap and expensive. LLL moves, looks good and I'm happy in them. Canadian clothes have always been so much better, try 'em.

anonymous Apr 12, 2012 7:00am

Lululemon is the only brand that doesnt start to stink after a few weeks. I work in a hot yoga studio and before we received the Lululemon clothes, everyone had a faint BO smell. Even Tide Sport with a cup of vinegar only went so far. It got so bad we wrote an article on "how to keep your clothes smelling fresh" in the monthly newsletter. So…thank you Lululemon. While expensive, the pants I bought two years smell as good as the day I bought them.

And as far as appealing to our insecurities…I agree. Marketers have found a new niche and its working. Women have spent decades trying to look the way society portrays them in magazines and TV. From the curvy size 14 of Monroe to the size 0 of runway models to now "strong is the new skinny." At least this is a healthier fad…

anonymous Apr 11, 2012 4:28pm

I'm a 50-year-old guy from Texas. LLL makes the only yoga wear that fits my body. The 3/4 length (Down Dog) pants work to help cushion the tips of my tibias where I suffer from Osgood Schlatters disease. The first LLL I bought four years ago is still in good condition even though I've worn it day in and day out. I'd say it has been a good buy regardless of the higher initial cost. Do you people really think you can judge a person's insides by their outsides – by what they choose to wear to class? If so, you just need to look in a mirror more often.

anonymous Apr 11, 2012 3:41pm

The "Say No To Cameltoe" poster is pretty hilarious…

anonymous Apr 10, 2012 10:56pm

I teach yoga. I can't breathe in Lulu. I once saw a group of 50yish women wore it at a yoga studio. They looked like a group of high schoolers. Perhaps that was the point. Where is the originality, creativity or maturity?

    anonymous Apr 11, 2012 10:17am

    They left those in the dressing room closet with their tiny miniskirts and their designer heels …

anonymous Apr 10, 2012 5:49pm

I buy yoga clothes because I can't wear the same outfit every day. I don't buy at lululemon b/c it's too expensive. However, their tops are pretty awesome and actually fit+stay where they are supposed to. And they are long enough. yet, most of my yoga clothes is from Old Navy, a regular sports store and Joe Fresh. No one cares at my studio and most people mix&match.

anonymous Apr 10, 2012 1:03pm

I think that it doesnt matter what you wear to yoga. If you are wearing a paper bag or $1000 pair of pants. If you mind is where it needs to be and you are comfortable and present then thats all that matters. Me personally I wear Nike or similar running pants or my lululemon pants. I also have shirts of both styles. If someone wants to come into the studio or w/e and show of their clothes and get a workout then awesome for them. If you come in to the studio with a spiritual mind set again awesome. Either way it doesnt matter what you wear.

anonymous Apr 10, 2012 6:18am

Lululemon and money spent on it is directly related to where one practices, IMO. I tend to enjoy yoga more at gyms and community centers due to the LACK of Lululemon and associated attitude. I feel quite at home in my Kohl's, Old Navy, Target, and assorted gym wear. Most of the other people practicing there sport the same. I guess people who practice here put a premium on value. They tend to be older and wiser and less about what is the current yoga fashion trend. Clearly not the target demographic of LL. Don't mistake their lack of concern for lack of commitment. They are deeply committed to their practices. Practices they dictate for themselves and not directed by some marketing agency.

    anonymous Apr 11, 2012 10:15am

    Or some rock-star or rock-star-wannabe yogi … or, even worse, the Yoga Teacher to the Future Yoga Rock Stars …
    they may be spiritual as all get-out, but they will bash any attempts at following their flows if they aren't graceful … !

anonymous Apr 10, 2012 6:17am

I've been practicing yoga and Buddhism for 8 years and I had taken pride in the fact that I've never purchased a yoga or Buddhism product- no spiritual materialism here, right? In fact, I would usually wear to yoga used clothes that I got at the thrift shop. However, there is a major problem: most men's athletic clothes are too baggy. When I'm teaching yoga or taking it with my teacher, it needs to be clear what is happening with my legs. During the winter, I prefer not to wear shorts. The solution?

Sports stores that sell women's yoga pants looked at me like I was crazy when I asked about men's yoga pants. I found a pair of women's athletic pants at the thrift shop, which were tighter, but still flexible. But this introduced a new problem: an awkward bulge resulting from the fact that the pants aren't cut for men. So, the last time I was in Boston, I reluctantly went to the Lululemon shop to try on some custom men's yoga pants. I thought they looked awesome, but I wasn't willing to shell out the cost on the price tag… so I peruse ebay.

anonymous Apr 10, 2012 6:05am

Interesting. While both arguments are viable, which is it: Insecurity or the female demographic of success? I found the article interesting either way.

anonymous Apr 10, 2012 4:34am

Just posted to "Featured Today" on the Elephant Yoga homepage.

Tanya Lee Markul, Yoga Editor
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anonymous Apr 10, 2012 3:23am

Posted to Elephant Yoga on Facebook and Twitter.

Tanya Lee Markul, Yoga Editor
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Waylon Lewis, founder of Elephant Journal & host of Walk the Talk Show with Waylon Lewis, is a 1st generation American Buddhist “Dharma Brat.” Voted #1 in U.S. on twitter for #green two years running, Changemaker & Eco Ambassador by Treehugger, Green Hero by Discovery’s Planet Green, Best (!) Shameless Self-Promoter at Westword’s Web Awards, Prominent Buddhist by Shambhala Sun, & 100 Most Influential People in Health & Fitness 2011 by “Greatist”, Waylon is a mediocre climber, lazy yogi, 365-day bicycle commuter & best friend to Redford (his rescue hound). His aim: to bring the good news re: “the mindful life” beyond the choir & to all those who didn’t know they gave a care. elephantjournal.com | His first book, Things I would like to do with You, touches on modern relationships from a Buddhist point of view. His dream of 9 years, the Elephant “Ecosystem” will find a way to pay 1,000s of writers a month, helping reverse the tide of low-quality, unpaid writing & reading for free online.