6.4

Finally: a Barbie Doll with Average Proportions!

lammily

Felephant reads:

> Image: Indian Barbie.
Tina Fey’s prayer for her Daughter.
> Old Barbie: Every body gets Old.
Girl Gone: the Aftermath of Mothering. 

These are the words of designer Nickolay Lamm, who created a “Normal Barbie” that he calls Lammily, using the average proportions of a 19-year-old woman.

He reached his goal—and well beyond!—through Crowdfunder in under 24 hours. The masses were clearly ready for and welcoming Lammily with open arms.

The following are some of Lamm’s designs comparing the original Barbie with a “Normal Barbie.”

bb compare

I love the booty in this one! I know it from the reflection in my own mirror.

And the comparison illustrates how alien-teeny the original Barbie’s feel look.

bb compare 2

Journalist Nina Golgowski wrote in the Daily Mail:

If Barbie was a real woman she’d be forced to walk on all fours and would be physically incapable of lifting her over-sized head – perhaps a far cry from what the designers of Mattel envisioned. Her 16-inch waist would also be four inches thinner than her head, leaving room for only half a liver and a few inches of intestine. Like her fragile 3.5 inch wrists, her 6-inch ankles would prevent her from heavy lifting. Then, as far as holding up her entire body – despite so much of it missing – it’d be an entirely impossible feat requiring her to walk on all fours.

barbie imgur

Even CNN got their hands on reporting this:

This is the kind of news I will hear about then spend a week screaming from the social networking mountaintops.

I just ordered a Lammily doll for my daughter. For more information about masterind Nickolay Lamm, visit his website.

 

Relephant:

Marketing Yoga Without a Hot Barbie Body: Challenges & Opportunities.

> Does Barbie influence children? Yes: Barbie Exposure May Limit Girls’ Career Imagination: Girls who played with dolls were then asked about future careers. Those who played with Barbie more likely to envision traditional pink-collar jobs than were girls who played with Mrs. Potato Head.  (scientificamerican.com)

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Editor: Renée Picard

Photos: Nickolay Lamm / Lammily / imgur

Bonus: What if Fashion Dolls Were Made Using Standard Human Body Proportions?

How to love yourself exactly as you are:

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Sarah Oct 11, 2015 7:01am

There is no doll or toy or picture that can cause a child (or adult for that matter) to develop a healthy body image. This is only done with good parenting and then further hard work by the individual as they grow up. And, as a parent, that’s pretty terrifying, given the constant stream of unrealistic images everyone is bombarded with these days. Be thin but not too thin, or be fat, but, you know, healthy fat, and try this diet that will help you drop 10 lbs this weekend, but make sure you still have a healthy relationship with food, because really it doesn’t matter what size you are. As long as you are the right size. And whatever you do, don’t become obsessed with your looks. Just look exactly right.
The biggest take away I have from this doll is we are so desperately obsessed with this body image issue, we are looking to toys to do the work we should just be doing as individuals.

Arlene Aug 4, 2015 4:50pm

Iam over 54 years old African American I am very slim just like the thin barbie all of my life..so no such thing as most women are fat, that's a lesson just because your black ..iam living proof of that . bobby looks good either way

Caroline Aug 4, 2015 2:54pm

I like the idea of a realistic (but pretty) body for Barbie. However, American girls have an average BMI of about 28. In other parts of the world (Europe minus the UK, and Asia) the average BMI is about 22 or 23. So for us, it's more like a "plus-size" Barbie.

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Heather Grimes

Heather is a full-time mama to her five-year-old daughter, Opal.
She’s also a part-time massage therapist to a variety of lovely folks, with a focus on old ladies.
In the gaps, she writes, sews, reads, roller skates, falls, writes more, walks and relaxes with her awesome friends and husband.
She also loves to tell stories on stage.
You can find her at hcgrimes.org.
You can also check out her—now, inactive—blog at: thegrimesfamilychronicles.blogspot.com.