Let’s Talk About Sex (and Support Indie Media).

Via on Jun 22, 2010

How to Lose Your Virginity Just Rounded Third Base. Help them Make it Home!

It’s hard to escape the subject of sex.

Images of sex saturate advertisements, gyrating teens proclaim abstinence and millions of dollars of federal money has been funneled into abstinence-only “sexual education.” Virginity has become another commodity sold to the highest bidder, teens are sexting and wanna-be celebrities are caught in sex-tape “scandals.” Sex trafficking is the number one crime worldwide, daughters vow to save their virginity for their husbands by “marrying” their fathers with purity pledges while male virginity is mocked. Pornography informs mainstream heterosexual notions of sexuality while girls are increasingly sexualized at younger and younger ages, women are “rejuvenating” and bling-ing out their vaginas. Sex scandals are commonplace whether it be a celebrity, politician or religious leader, and it’s becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish pornography from pop culture. Whew!

Frankly, I’m bored with and annoyed by this cultural obsession with sex.

These manufactured, one-dimensional images of heterosexual sexuality constantly shoved down my throat (no pun intended). Running parallel to the cultural obsession with sex (and nude or near-nude ladies that grace countless magazine covers, billboards and populate advertisements), is the obsession with female virginity (so much so that many women opt to have their virginity restored via plastic surgery).

Clearly, with all this sex out there, the important issues regarding sex and sexuality are glossed over and given little media coverage. What remains in the public eye remains a vapid, one-dimensional image of sexuality and a perpetual reinforcement of the good girl/bad girl, madonna/whore dichotomy. In this strange cultural climate where contradictory messages are being sent simultaneously, Therese Schecter is a breath of fresh air.

Let me introduce you to Therese.

Therese’s production company, Trixie Films, produced the celebrated  and important documentary I was a Teenage Feminist, a personal and political discovery why women, including Therese herself, rejected a movement that changed women’s lives for the better on countless levels.

Therese is currently examining the culture of virginity from a feminist standpoint in her new, yet unfinished, documentary How to Lose Your Virginity.

The ultimate goal of the project is to create an honest conversation about female sexuality, whether women choose to have sex or not. The documentary and accompanying blog, The American Virgin, is one of the only aggressively sex-positive forums while being committed to non-judgmental space for people who are not sexually active.


Given the culture’s confusing sexual climate, this sex-positive, non-judgmental space has garnered tons of feedback.

Thank you so much for helping me put my confusing, frustrating thoughts on sex and relationships into perspective. It really makes me feel so much less like an outcast and more able to take ownership of how I feel and not to listen to what others tell me.

For more comments, click here. For more on Therese and her intention with the film, read her interview with Beth Schacter here.

Therese’s current project is of huge importance and is anxiously awaited by countless individuals (myself included!) and the trailer is already being used in college Human Sexuality courses.

But the film needs your support!

Trixie films has 9 days left to reach $10,000 in pledges in order to receive funding that will allow the film to be completed. For information on pledging and reward for each funding level, click here.

Originally posted at Feminist Fatale.


About Melanie Klein

Melanie Klein, MA is a writer, speaker and Associate Faculty member at Santa Monica College, teaching Sociology and Women’s Studies. She attributes feminism and yoga as the two primary influences in her work. She is committed to communal collaboration, raising consciousness, media literacy, facilitating the healing of distorted body images and promoting healthy body relationships. She has worked with the new citizen journalists of the LA Academy of Global Girl Media and the peer-educators of J.A.D.E (Joint Advocates on Disordered Eating) on ways to tap into the power of their own voice. She is an expert contributor in the areas of media literacy and body image issues for Proud2Bme, a NEDA project. She is the adviser of the Santa Monica College Leadership Alliance and the founder and co-coordinator of WAM! Los Angeles. She founded FeministFatale.com and is a contributor at Adios Barbie, Intent.com, MindBodyGreen and Ms. Magazine’s blog. Her essay on yoga, body image and feminism appears in Curvy Voices and her extended chapter on the same topic is included in the anthology, 21st Century Yoga: Culture, Politics and Practice. She has been featured on HuffPostLive, KPFK’s Feminist Magazine and The Point on The Young Turks. She is featured in the forthcoming book, Conversations With Modern Yogis. Twitter: @feministfatale

846 views

3 Responses to “Let’s Talk About Sex (and Support Indie Media).”

  1. Stephanie Potter says:

    I'm so tired of the subject, discouraged by the regression, encouraged that women like you are still out there working.
    Thank You.

  2. Thanks so much @Stephanie.

Leave a Reply