Plastic Free Is Possible. {Book Review}

Via on Jul 24, 2012

Look around you right now. How many items within reach contain plastic?

Ugh. Diamonds are forever? I don’t know about that, but plastic will be with us forever—and not in a good way. Besides the environmental impact, the health impact of BPA and other chemicals concerns me too. How is this affecting our food, our drinking water? If I wouldn’t want my kids to eat toxins, why would I want their food wrapped in them?

Plastic-free isn’t possible in today’s world, is it? I didn’t really think it was. I try to be conscientious and limit things bought with plastic and excess packaging. I encourage interest in plastic free toys for the kids. I bring my reusable bags everywhere I might need them. But “plastic free” didn’t feel possible—until I read Beth Terry’s book.

What I loved about Plastic Free is that it wasn’t just facts and stats about why you should avoid using plastic, it was a practical guide with solutions offered for replacing all the typically plastic items we use. There are ideas for small and large changes. This doesn’t have to be a several thousand dollar project where you throw out and replaced every plastic item you own. There are helpful ideas for phasing out what you have and simple (and often inexpensive) solutions for everyday issues including listing of specific brands and websites as well as do-it-yourself ideas.

It also isn’t a “sit back and consume” advice guide. Beth gives practical advice on how to contact companies and local business about changing their practices. There are tips on everything from throwing a “zero-waste party,” to the best way to store different types of fruits and vegetables without plastic, to non-toxic cleaning solutions. This isn’t one of those books that you read and think, “oh, that’s nice. I should do something about that.” This is one of those books that you pull out and refer to all the time. I’ve got it wedged up in with my cookbooks and am already pulling it out several times a week for new ideas.

If you are looking to reduce your plastic use, or for a gift for an eco-conscious friend, I would recommend Plastic Free.

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About Kate Bartolotta

Kate Bartolotta is the strongest girl in the world. She is the love child of a pirate and a roller derby queen. She hails from the second star to the right. Her love of words is boundless, but she knows that many of life’s best moments are completely untranslatable. When she is not writing, you may find her practicing yoga, devouring a book, playing with her children, planting dandelions, or dancing barefoot with her heart on her sleeve. She is madly in love with life and does not know how this story ends; she’s making it up as she goes. Kate is the owner and editor-in-chief of Be You Media Group. She also writes for The Huffington Post, elephant journal, The Good Men Project, The Green Divas, Yoganonymous, The Body Project, Project Eve, Thought Catalog and Soulseeds. She facilitates writing workshops and retreats throughout North America. Heart Medicine, Kate's book on writing, is now available on Amazon.com You can follow Kate on Facebook and Twitter

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5 Responses to “Plastic Free Is Possible. {Book Review}”

  1. Mamaste says:

    Just intro'd to FB on : Family & Health & Wellness.
    ~Mamaste

  2. Paul Martin says:

    I got to know about this book from my friend. I guess, that would have been the best possible thing that could have happened. I would say I was not a eco conscious person before, but after reading this, have become one. Thanks Beth.

  3. [...] than a steel water bottle. We forget to look behind the curtain and see what is really going on, where the plastic came from and where it is going and how it is contaminating our bodies and our [...]

  4. Patricia says:

    I think the world can go without plastic if a massive worldwide effort is undertaken. That means a model of sustainable plastic should be prompted with the help of plastic machining that creates less plastic and more bio. Then we can move to the next phase of cutting down production.

  5. [...] say it’s nearly impossible to avoid plastic in our every day lives. I typed this post—and you’re likely reading it—on a computer which has many [...]

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