Pratyahara: Withdrawing the Senses & Truly Enjoying your Yoga.

Via on Jul 18, 2012

 

Classically, pratyahara translates as withdrawal of the senses.

Pratyahara is described as causing your senses “to imitate” the withdrawal of the mind inwards as happens during practice, like a turtle withdrawing its head, arms and legs into its shell. In practice, you withdraw your mind inwards by refraining from the urge to immediately react to incoming sensation, you approach stilling the mind by shifting the act of sensing from an external to an internal orientation.

You stop trying to jump out through the senses to the thing sensed, and instead you remain inside your body and let the impressions come in from out there. Then, the feeling tones of the sensations can linger within you and mingle with your inner awareness, you can give more attention to your thoughts, feelings, perceptions, desires, aversions and other inner states in relationship to what is seen, heard or felt. This staying home and letting impressions come to you instead being moved, pushed or pulled by them is a major theme in practice, and is the reason for seeking the immovable spot in your asanas.

In the immovable spot, in deep internal awareness you awaken buddhi, your highest mind, your awakened intellect, your inner faculty of discriminative intelligence. Perceiving through buddhi you bring sensory information into you with new awareness, you mix with it as though slowing down time, slowing down the relay of sensory information.

Then, the response that you generate has the affirmation of and congruence with the psychological and spiritual dimension of the object and including these dimensions makes for a more accurate reflection of the reality of the object.

You initially develop your practice using the outer limbs (three, four and five:  asana, pranayama, pratyahara) but you also simultaneously work with the inner limbs (six, seven and eight: dharana, dhyana, samadhi).

This means that from day one you endeavor to develop extraordinary powers of concentration, and this is the core of yoga practice. These concentrating powers could be called super-sensory because the act of seeing or feeling becomes heightened to a marvelous degree.

It is as though you get new eyes and ears, new senses. You not only perceive color more vividly and enjoy your food more, but also when you truly wake up your senses, you wake to and value the inner psychological and spiritual dimensions that are the substance and source of what you feel, see, taste, smell and hear.

Pratyahara is situated directly in the middle of the eight limbs, its central position indicates that it is the point where the outer can become inner (and also the reverse). Pratyahara is the bridge limb that shows you how to use asana and pranayama to find dhyana and samadhi, how to use your postures for concentrating your mind, for accurately tuning in, for reading, and responding to your mental states.

Thus you can cultivate a more intimate relationship to your experience of sensation as a way inward towards concentration, towards buddhi, mental clarity, and thus towards self or individuation. Using your body and your breathing to change your relationship to the sensory information you receive helps you bring more mind, more psychology, more honesty and authenticity to your awareness and your self-reflection. You use these new dimensions, this new inner directed consciousness to find more accurate physical alignment that brings deeper significance, more beauty and more grounded weight to your postures and movement.

David Garrigues

Lastly, one final unexpected gift from the fifth limb emerges from another less common translation of the word pratyahara: to recover the senses. To recover the senses as opposed to withdrawing them conveys a different flavor to pratyahara by suggesting that the senses are “lost” or somehow need to be re-found or reclaimed. This perspective can lead you to a new relationship to sensation and to a transformation of the disreputable word sensual.

What if through pratyahara you are meant to master your senses by using them more completely for the enjoyment and expression of your divinity, your most conscious, profound aspects? Rather than attempting to withdraw the senses by cutting them off or diminishing their range, in practicing pratyahara you also engage the senses consciously and wholeheartedly in order to have more clarity about what to withdraw from and how to do it.

The word sensual is defined as:
1) Relating to or affecting any of the senses or a sense organ; sensory.
2) a. providing gratification of the physical, sexual appetites
b. Physical rather than spiritual or intellectual.
c. Lacking in moral or spiritual interests; worldly.

But we could allow the concept of sensuality to expand into a context that combines the sacred and the physical, and such a combined context could be developed to perfection within an asana practice. In this light the ability to be sensual is an essential part of having a mature, satisfying asana practice.

If done with precision and honesty enjoying sensuality could help your asana practice become a great art, a tremendous achievement of skill and craft, a soulful inhabiting of the body to such a degree as to achieve the highest mastery of aestheticism and discrimination. This mastery would extend to every thing you experience.

Sensual could then be an integral part of pratyahara, to cultivate your sensuality could mean to thoroughly apprehend and appreciate what you, your whole body, your nose, eyes, ears, heart, loins, and viscera takes in from the world as means of accurately reflecting soul in your depths and spirit in your aspirations. In fact purusa or spirit, the highest conception of samkhya yoga is also known as The Enjoyer. Who better than purusa to be essentially sensual, to consummately know and appreciate the myriad forms of creation by adopting the ultimate asana, the seat or the perspective of the supreme enjoyer, the one who takes it all in pure, bold, unashamed and unblemished enjoyment.

~

Editor: Kate Bartolotta

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About David Garrigues

David Garrigues is an international yoga teacher. He is recognized as one of a few teachers in the US certified to teach Ashtanga Yoga by the late world renown yoga master Sri K Pattabhi Jois. As an Ashtanga Ambassador he bases his teachings on the idea that 'Anyone can take practice', a core idea in the teachings of Sri K Pattabhi Jois. David's mission is to help others flourish within the living, contemporary lineage of Ashtanga Yoga. He aims to be part of an ever wider circle of people who are committed to applying the teachings of ashtanga yoga in ways that promote physical, psychological, and spiritual growth in themselves and others. David's website and highly popular youtube video channel, Asana Kitchen, has a wealth of free, expert yoga instructional materials to inspire progress in beginner through advanced practitioners. He is the author of three Ashtanga Yoga dvd's, A Guide to the Primary Series, A Guide to the Ashtanga Yoga Pranayama Sequence, and A Guide to the Second Series. His book Vayu Siddhi: A Guide to Free Breathing was written and inspired by yogic sacred texts on the science of asana and pranayama, the two favorite subjects of students of ashtanga yoga. He is the director of the Ashtanga Yoga School of Philadelphia and the Ashtanga Yoga School of Kovalam in India.

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10 Responses to “Pratyahara: Withdrawing the Senses & Truly Enjoying your Yoga.”

  1. [...] item up, also at ej. Since we’re point you there, anyway… have a look. It’s on Pratyahara. (So, does that mean don’t [...]

  2. Thaddeus Haas Thaddeus1 says:

    "What if through pratyahara you are meant to master your senses by using them more completely for the enjoyment and expression of your divinity, your most conscious, profound aspects? Rather than attempting to withdraw the senses by cutting them off or diminishing their range, in practicing pratyahara you also engage the senses consciously and wholeheartedly in order to have more clarity about what to withdraw from and how to do it."

    This is a very nice idea and one that I think accentuates very nicely the concept of "bhedabheda" in Vaisnava philosophy. Translated as "simultaneously one and different," it refers to one's qualitative relationship with the Supreme, but I think we can also apply such a distinction to our ashtanga practice by realizing that as we are seeking to find union with our higher selves such an orientation requires a disengagement with certain features of that world.

    In other words, pratyahara, understood as a "mastering of the senses," need not be understood as a rejection of the world, but a deepening towards a more full and authentic relationship. Thus, once we acquire a taste for the wonders of this inner world, we might come to a place where the those things which once seemed so shiny and cool slowly loose their luster.

    Posting to Elephant Ashtanga. Be sure to Like Elephant Ashtanga on Facebook.

  3. athayoganusasanam says:

    That cetwari is so beautiful….the article is great too…but seriously, that chaturanga is a masterpiece in action. :)

  4. Or perhaps we should withdraw our projections(reality as we see it when we remove what we can't accept and add what we think should be there) and awaken our true perception, seeing things as they truly are.

  5. Maria Van Liew says:

    What I love about the author's insights into the role of sensuality in the pursuit of our highest potential is that they honor the role of physical expression as an art form, a craft that contributes something in and of itself. Without this it would be much more difficult to "feel" the honing of deeper discernment. It seems that developing a relationship between the gross and the subtle can warrant a ripple of alignments that allow us to fly.

    "You use these new dimensions, this new inner directed consciousness to find more accurate physical alignment that brings deeper significance, more beauty and more grounded weight to your postures and movement."

  6. [...] Pratyahara: Withdrawing the Senses & Truly Enjoying your Yoga. [...]

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  8. [...] >> Pratyahara, or withdrawing the senses from their external objects. We do this as a matter of course during many yoga classes, ideally becoming more indrawn during the session, to taste the nectar of the peaceful, joyful inner Self. [...]

  9. [...] article. I cannot say with words, I cannot elucidate via social media or through elephant journal the profound grace and beauty possible from a devoted yoga practice. On behalf of Vital Yoga, and because we see ourselves as stewards of this practice, our intention [...]

  10. jeromearmstrong says:

    This is along the lines of how I approach the term. That of recovering ones full integration into the wholeness of the sensual experience, without clinging or attachment, without rejection or judgement, just having an increased awareness of your embodiment in the present. Pratyahar is like a stream flowing, all the time all around us, and one ultimately has to get beyond the duality of objects to realize through experience, that everything is connected. Energetically, it's all within touch, taste, smell, hearing, and sight. We can open to feeling it all, and yes, through asana practice. For the ancients, the most basic asana poses were the sitting meditative ones.

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