To Vaccinate or Not to Vaccinate? ~ Stefanie DeWysockie

Via on Dec 27, 2012

Source: aim4thex.tumblr.com via Rebecca on Pinterest

 

Editor’s Note: This article is the author’s view, of course: it should be used for educational purposes only and should not be used for diagnosis or to guide treatment without the advice of a health professional. Any of us who are concerned about his or her health should contact a doctor for advice.

The body has immense healing capabilities when it can use its own resources.

Each year millions of vaccines are given. Some people have an immediate reaction following the injection and others have frequent long-term reactions, such as colds and viruses. So what causes these reactions and the differences between them? First, let’s look at the immune system and how it is affected by vaccines.

The Immune System

The immune system is made up of the thymus gland, spleen, bone marrow, adenoids, tonsils and the lymphatic system. The thymus and bone marrow produce lymphocytes (white blood cells) and destroy invaders such as bacteria, viruses and fungal and parasitic infections.

The body uses natural barriers to protect itself from invaders, like the skin and hair. This is passive immunity. Then we gain what is called acquired immunity, which is the body’s response to invaders over the years. These organisms go into a filing system and when the body meets the returning invaders it can deal with them in a natural response. The tonsils, adenoids and lymph nodes all protect the body by keeping invaders from entering the blood stream.

How a Vaccine Affects the Body

After a vaccine is injected, it introduces large amounts of antigens straight into the bloodstream. When this happens, the body’s natural defense mechanisms are bypassed and the immune system registers an attack. The immune system is thus weakened and cannot protect itself by stimulation and the production of antibodies (natural immunity), making us even more susceptible to invaders.

When antibiotics are introduced on top of the vaccination it becomes even harder for the body to protect itself, especially in children dealing with infections. The body has immense healing capabilities when it can use its own resources.

How to Build Immunity

>> Breastfeed your children during their passive immunity stage. As they reach the acquired immunity stage, try natural antibiotics such as Echinacea and garlic. These have no side effects and help strengthen the immune system.

> Do a gentle detox, like drinking a mixture of distilled water, vitamin C and garlic.

> Fix your biochemistry with a hair mineral analysis.

> Have a reflexology session to aid circulation and proper hormone function.

> Do gentle exercises to rid the body of toxins through the skin and help flush toxins from the organs and lymphatic system.

> Avoid pollutants, smoke, alcohol and processed foods and add lots of vegetables to your diet.

Bonus: this info has been added by your friendly local editor, and did not come via the author, and so represents various points of view:

Source: Uploaded by user via Susan on Pinterest

Source: fr.gavialliance.org via Alicia on Pinterest

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Sources re the article:

September 27, 2011,Vaccines Have Serious Side Effects – The Institute of Medicine Says So!, Accessed September, 2012

Ann Gillanders, The Complete Reflexology Tutor, Octopus Publishing Group, 2007

Lawrence Wilson, M.D., Nutritional Balancing And Hair Mineral Analysis, L.D. Wilson Consultants, Inc., 1991

 

 

Stephanie-DeWysockieStefanie DeWysockie is the owner of Taken Back to Nature, LLC, and a holistic health practitioner, yoga and prenatal yoga instructor, writer and author. She loves nature and creating; she makes skin care products without harmful chemicals or preservatives and works in her field as a health and fitness counselor. You can follow her at www.takenbacktonature.com or www.facebook.com/holistichealthnow.

 

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Ed: Stephanie V.

 

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7 Responses to “To Vaccinate or Not to Vaccinate? ~ Stefanie DeWysockie”

  1. Timmy_Robins says:

    The good news is that the Dr that claimed a link between autism and vaccines was found to have committed fraud in his studies and stripped of his medical license. The bad news is that the damage is done and that nothing will stop the uninformed from spreading the idea that vaccines are a menace for years to come….Nevermind the millions of lives that have been saved by them.

    • elephantjournal says:

      Another comment on that tip via FB, and my reply:

      Peter L While these articles can present certain valid points they are anchored in a dangerous, anti-science position. What they implicitly recommend is no antibiotics and no vaccinations. We'll just gargle with garlic water and give our feet acupressure rubs to stimulate our immune system. This is so monumentally idiotic. Stopping childhood vaccinations will open the floodgates of epidemics that have been almost completely curtailed through vaccinations.

      elephantjournal.com Peter, did you read the article? I as editor added a bunch of infographics that countered the article's point. And, the advice in the article is solid, whether as I said one is a vaccine doubter or no. And, there's an editor's note. Did you read the article before commenting?

      (PS I generally agree with your point, which is why I did all of that)

  2. Nan Sheppard says:

    Wow, Stephanie, do you have a child? When we lived in Trinidad, there was an outbreak of Dengue fever and my eight-year-old fell ill, along with lots of other people. There is no vaccination for Dengue, but like many diseases that are preventable by vaccination, it can be fatal. While I was nursing him back to health, another child and an adult nearby died of the same disease. It's scary to have a child that ill and to know that they might die. He bounced back, luckily.

    Reactions to vaccinations are rarer than deaths from preventable diseases, and when you vaccinate, you help to save millions of lives by reducing or stopping the spread of disease. Smallpox and Polio were once a menace, and I bet you and your loved ones have not had whooping cough, which is a horrible disease. Although it looks like whooping cough may be making a comeback now, thanks to the thousands of parents who have decided not to vaccinate.

    Do a little more research, and try not to make sweeping statements like, 'Others have long term reactions like colds and viruses'. What on earth do you mean by that?? Vaccinations can't cause colds.

    Love from an organic, veg, yoga-loving, vaccination fan.

  3. Peter says:

    And Stefanie was fully vaccinated as a child! Sorry, Stefanie, when I see a Ph.D. or an MD after your name I'll take your comments a little more seriously. Putting up "pop" posters and implying that vaccinations and antibiotics should not be taken is profoundly irresponsible. Why don't YOU stop all use of modern medicine?

  4. mivox says:

    Why was this article even published? Can I also expect to see articles from climate change deniers, intelligent design advocates, and perhaps folks who think my body can shut down my own reproductive system in response to sexual assault?

    Presenting both sides of a scientific argument is neither fair nor admirable, when there is no actual scientific argument to be had. Breastfeeding did not wipe out polio & smallpox, vaccines did. Garlic will not wipe out cervical cancer, but a vaccine could.

    Also, the author’s explanation is not how vaccines work. Additionally, vaccines do not cause either colds or viruses.

    • elephantjournal says:

      See my comment to Peter, above. We welcome both sides of an argument, if only to destroy it with logic. I'd welcome articles about how gmos are great, Mitt Romney is awesome, sexism is okay and hummers are eco! Given the nature of web 2.0, we'll all do what we're doing–commenting, creating awareness. It's like a trojan horse for ignorance.

      That said, if you've checked my comment to Peter, above, I don't welcome views without proper context. So I appreciate your comment, at least to the extent that you're respectfully talking with the author, instead of at her.

      >< While these articles can present certain valid points they are anchored in a dangerous, anti-science position. What they implicitly recommend is no antibiotics and no vaccinations. We'll just gargle with garlic water and give our feet acupressure rubs to stimulate our immune system. This is so monumentally idiotic. Stopping childhood vaccinations will open the floodgates of epidemics that have been almost completely curtailed through vaccinations.

      elephantjournal.com Peter, did you read the article? I as editor added a bunch of infographics that countered the article's point. And, the advice in the article is solid, whether as I said one is a vaccine doubter or no. And, there's an editor's note. Did you read the article before commenting?

      (PS I generally agree with your point, which is why I did all of that)

  5. I would agree that vaccinations aren't all risk free, and there are scientific arguments on both sides here. Unfortunately, the article didn't present them!

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