A misconception that some men have about those women who teach yoga.

Via Katie Collins
on Feb 17, 2014
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“Yes I’m a 24 year old single Yoga instructor, no, I will not have sex with you.”

I walk into a local bar. Should I play the “yoga teacher card” or the “nursing student” card, tonight?

Am I looking for a one-night stand or a possible relationship? Because it always amazes me, the polar opposite reactions I get:

So Katie, what do you do for a living? “Well, I’m primarily a yoga instructor.”

Guy’s eyes open wide, sudden not-so-subtle look up and down at my body.

“Wow, so you must be good in bed.” Seriously? Got that one once, meant to be a joke I’m sure.

The end. Next bar.

So, Katie what do you do for a living? “Well, right now I’m a full-time nursing student.”

“Wow, I have a lot of respect for you. You must work really hard and care about people.” That’s the gist of it.

Correct. Keep going, kind sir.

I lead a fortunate life. I am healthy, happy and yes, single.

But I’m not going to sit here and tell you it’s all roses to be in your mid 20s and be a single yoga instructor looking for “the one.”

First off, I lost my boyfriend the weekend before my last yoga teacher training immersion. It just got to be too much. He said I was “changing.” And I was, but for the better.

My yoga training taught me to love all souls—everybody, whatever our differences. And to be the most beautiful soul you know. I learned that there was no way I could be of service to someone else if I wasn’t first going to serve myself.

And that didn’t have to mean to start being selfish; it just meant to start being me. I learned to stop pretending that I liked sleeping in until 11am. The real me wants to get up, get my practice in, and work hard strive to be a better being. For now, yes, I am doing this for myself, but only because I want to offer others the best version of myself, and to be attractive to those who…”get it.” If you want to serve others, love others with all your heart and entire being, we must serve ourselves—we must look within and ask, “What makes me truly happy?” and “What can I do today that’s going to reflect who I truly am?” And: what is going to allow me to aspire to be the best wife, the best mother, the best teacher?

So why is it so hard to find a partner? Simple. Respect. I don’t need to go on and on. That’s it.

When I go out to meet new people, I feel an immediate, sad disconnect with the guys I tell I’m a yoga instructor because, apparently, their mind goes into the bedroom…”…Hmmm I bet she can put her legs behind her head..!” (News flash, not every yogi can!)

Katie_456_Edit

I work hard as a yogi—I don’t chataraunga for strong arms so I can throw men onto a bed. 

I have a daily practice that allows me to explore, to create, to release anxiety and stress so that when I do step into a bar, a studio or classroom, I am attracted to those who seek a mindful journey.

The journey is the reward. At first I was caught up looking for the one, but now my perspective has changed. Now, and everyday, I just aim to be a better Katie and to enjoy the journey that will ultimately find me my true love.

I encourage you to do the same. If you are one of the thousands of single humans out there, aim to create your own journey to love. Strive to be the best version of yourself.

If you build it, the love will come.

 

Relephant reads:

What Does a Yoga Teacher Look Like?

Dude, Please Don’t Hit On Me At Yoga.

Men Who Marry Their Yoga Instructors.

A much better way to go:

~

Editor: Waylon Lewis

Photos:

Jp Elario

GTS Clothing


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About Katie Collins

Albany native Katie Collins is a certified yoga instructor, Jade yoga mat ambassador and representative for GTS Clothing. In college she visited nearby studios, discovering the balance that yoga brought to her life—offering an outlet for stress, a medium for expression, and a compliment to her studies. After graduating from Siena College in May 2012, Katie wanted to give back what wasn’t accessible to her. So, in the fall of 2013, she started the Siena College Yoga Intramural Program. After teaching for a year and being inspired by the growth of her students, certification was her next step. Practicing in the summer of 2013 under Justin Wolfer, Katie learned quickly what it meant to be a true “yogi”- commitment, dedication, trust and spirit. Connect with Katie on Facebook, or find her and her journey with GTS Clothing on Instagram/Twitter @katietheyogi.

Comments

56 Responses to “A misconception that some men have about those women who teach yoga.”

  1. Robert says:

    If I met a yoga girl, I would impress her with how well I can do the mountain pose and the corpse pose. I rock those! And if she wasn't impressed, I'd do the Lion Pose; but that's the limit of my yoga. I haven't gotten past that yet.

  2. Jay says:

    You try to find a partner at the bar? Good luck

  3. Shanti says:

    I agree with elephantjournal. Vanessa one thing yogis don't do is judge and generalize. I'd rather hang out with a yogi who occasionally drinks than one who thinks yogis are not yogis if they drink. Yikes.

  4. Roger says:

    You should date a yogi, not some guy you met at a bar!

  5. Rick Klingler says:

    You have got to be kidding me! Where in Tina's response did she "blame" the victim and for that matter why do you identify with the victim role at all. If you are a self realized adult woman you must realize that there are all sorts of individuals in the world with a wider variety of perspectives. You appear to paint the entire male species with a very broad brush. I found the entire article a rambling incohesive word salad without a lot of substance.

  6. Michael says:

    That's one thing about male/female relationships; some things never change. However, my experience with the "newly-sanctioned" yoga instructor was much different. Since my introduction to the practice was through a very spiritual Indian friend subsequant to my wife's death, I expected truth (satya), sincerity, and someone who could bring some peace back to my life. What I got were lies and deceit. I trusted her because of who she portrayed herself to be, not because of her rock-hard ass.
    The caveat: she was a newly anointed graduate of one of those money-making, yoga-training programs who had been abandoned by her 30+ year husband. She even opened her own studio with zero teaching experience. Apparently, I was the tool to help her self-esteem (Svadhyaya?).
    All the love that was left in the wake of loosing my soulmate, and the progress that was made with my Indian friend, has been displaced with distrust and hatred. Our seed body carries our Karma imprint, so no school can change who we really are, regardless of what we pretend to be on the outside. There's a decent probability we will die alone, so for me, loneliness is my demon on earth.
    I remain a student of yoga and will be going to India soon. The help I require can't be found in a "western sweat factory" where the green "teacher" walks around reading from a poetry book during savasana.