Want 70s groovin’ polyester swinger music + Tron-style 3D animation + Buddhism? Here you go.

Via on Jul 30, 2009

lounge dance disco 70sstupa karme cholingtron graphics 3D

New Stupa dedicated to Chogyam Trungpa to be built at Karme Choling in Barnet, Vermont.

‘Cause one Stupa just ain’t enough.

New Video.

Buddhists like to take the Bodhisattva vow, which dedicates their every energy to the welfare of others. Buddhists looove to build stupas, beautiful, meaning-imbued traditional reliquaries that embody various aspects of the Buddhist path.

stupa stupas

Via the Shambhalamountain.org web site:

It is well known that stupas are older than Buddhist tradition. In prehistoric times they were just a mound, tumuli (Skt.)–a place to bury important kings away from the village. Twenty-five hundred years ago, at the time of Shakyamuni Buddha’s death, a change came about in the way stupas were regarded.

The Buddha requested that his relics be placed in a familiar stupa, but with a shift in emphasis. Instead of being just a place of honor where the bones or relics of a cremated king were placed, the stupa was to be located at four corners (i.e., a crossroads), to remind people of the awakened state of mind. So stupas evolved from mounds of dirt (stup, Skt., “to heap up, pile, raise aloft, elevate”), to a king’s burial tomb, to a religious monument.

Around the time of the Buddha’s death, stupas began to be no longer used as a shrine to the dead, but to honor the living; to remind people far into the future that they, while living, have the seed of enlightenment. A stupa is calling to you, and you are the stupa. Its stability and reverence is based on compassion–to project the mind of the teacher as example, for the benefit of future generations.

A stupa is intended to stop you in your tracks. It is an architectural representation of the entire Buddhist path. The body, speech, and mind of an enlightened teacher is contained therein–a reminder of a timeless quality which one senses in old monuments. The Tibetan word is choten, meaning a receptacle for offerings and implying support for lay people to express devotion and connection to the Buddha mind.

Here’s a bit of the amazing symbolism that goes into the kind of Tibetan-style Stupa that’s already built, and always-nearly completed, at Shambhala Mountain Center. Click image below for more.

stupa symbolism shambhala trungpa

And finally, the brand-new Video re the next Stupa to be built, at Karme Choling:

Stupas are sacred structures designed to commemorate great teachers and radiate enlightened mind. A number of stupas are planned throughout the Shambhala mandala to commemorate the life and teaching of Vidyadhara Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche. One such stupa, the Great Stupa of Dharmakaya, has already been completed.

Karmê Chöling is the place where the Vidyadhara first established his teaching seat in North America, and the site where his body was cremated. It is now time to build a stupa at Karmê Chöling.

Our stupa, The Stupa That Conquers All Directions, will be about 50 feet high, and will house relics of the Vidyadhara. The site was located and consecrated by Eva Wong and Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche in May, 2006.

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One Response to “Want 70s groovin’ polyester swinger music + Tron-style 3D animation + Buddhism? Here you go.”

  1. [...] the early 70s, Rinpoche found it very curious that his Western students were so quick to try to warm up winter [...]

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