I Want to Know How it Feels to Care About Something Passionately.

Via on Apr 27, 2012

“I suppose I do have one unembarrassed passion. I want to know how it feels to care about something passionately.” —Adaptation (film), Meryl Streep

Why am I here? How did I get here? What am I doing with my life?

These days everybody seems to be looking for a profitable plan. I can’t really blame them. Life can appear pretty scary without one. Working to live, living to work—how do you really spend your time? Are you passionate about what you do? Or do you spend most of your time working a job you don’t love? And, when you’re not working, how much time do you spend trying to figure a way out?

How do they know?

I often wonder how it is that certain people know exactly what they want to do with their lives and how others spend a lifetime trying to figure it out. I have a few thoughts about this:

Perhaps it is that life and all its mystery spontaneously unfolds our individual purpose at its own time, will and discretion. That’s one. Or, perhaps it’s people’s circumstances, granted for whatever reason, that allow them a deeper sense of clarity and freedom to know and pursue their duty. Okay, that’s two.

And three, last but not least—what I believe to be the case for most of us (those of us having at least one foot in the land of confusion) is that when we truly realize that we are faced with this great feat, that the options are vast, that we actually have freedom to choose and discover who we are through such passionate tools, that instead of going for it, taking risks, following our hearts, we choose to remain exactly where we are simply because it seems easier, safer and whatever-er, knowing all the while that deep down inside, that right there, right in that place of resistance, that it is not and never will be the least bit satisfying.

Let’s hold hands while the walls come tumbling down.

I have always felt really moved when witnessing someone share their talent, their gift, their unique creativity (their purpose). It has always given me a tremendous amount of motivation—it’s quite an exchange of energy, right? You set me free—I set you free. We all become free to be who we are, magic happens, we all have a place and purpose in the Universe. Sweet.

I have a teacher that says, “You don’t have to have all the big answers right now. Just ask the questions and keep asking the questions. Let them simmer in your life. The answers will arrive when you are ready.”

So, for those of us who don’t really have a clue, we just have to ask? And, by just asking the questions, life shares some of its mystery and our inner inkling starts to surface? I dig it. So, when we avoid these questions, because they are difficult to answer, we lose a sense of who we truly are and we lose sight of our uniqueness and what we have to offer this life. Interesting. Could it be the case?

Ask the questions—keep asking the questions.

You don’t need something traumatic to happen in order to gain a free pass to change…a divorce, an accident, a break-up or have someone else make the decision for you, so you won’t be judged. Life is unfolding before you right now. Are you awake? Are you on board? Ask the questions and listen. Listen deeply. And, if you are really listening, what are you doing about it?

Change isn’t really a choice, being who you are is. How long are we going to pretend that we aren’t unique packages of creativity and purpose?

Welcome to your life.

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Read more:

Unique Asana: The Angel Opens Her Eyes.

In the Midst of Our Darkest Fears Emerge Our Wildest Dreams.

If Chuck Norris Did Yoga.

Like Elephant Yoga on Facebook.

About Tanya Lee Markul

Yoga Editor, Elephant Journal. I yoga, write, take photos and I investigate existentially. I got a thing for those who have found expression through some form of mastery or artistic fashion, and sincerity. (You set me free I set you). I adore anything that is equally cute and creepy. The most special ingredient you can find, be and put into anything is: yourself. Remember, everything you want, you already have and are. Look within. The more you use it, the more it will grow. For more randomness and love, visit me at Rebelle Lotus and, you don't want to miss the creative rebellion at Rebelle Society. Join us.

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14 Responses to “I Want to Know How it Feels to Care About Something Passionately.”

  1. Robert Piper Robert_Piper says:

    Great quote, "I have always felt really moved when witnessing someone share their talent, their gift, their unique creativity (their purpose). "

  2. [...] challenge in asking and answering this question is to dance at the edge of great seriousness and great lightness. If you are not serious enough, [...]

  3. Valerie Carruthers ValCarruthers says:

    Awesome article, dear T. God bless your teacher for saying, “You don’t have to have all the big answers right now. Just ask the questions and keep asking the questions. Let them simmer in your life. The answers will arrive when you are ready.”

    Your teacher summarized one of my favorite quotes from Rainer Maria Rilke, in Letters to a Young Poet: "Be patient toward all that is unsolved in your heart and try to love the questions themselves, like locked rooms and like books that are now written in a very foreign tongue. Do not now seek the answers, which cannot be given you because you would not be able to live them. And the point is, to live everything. Live the questions now. Perhaps you will then gradually, without noticing it, live along some distant day into the answer."

    I point this out because both comments show how in letting the questions "simmer" lie so many fabulous opportunities for cultivating patience, steadiness and service, among other qualities. The key is in the process as you say so beautifully: "We all become free to be who we are, magic happens…." xoxoxo taptaptaptap

    Just posted to "Featured Today" on the Elephant Spirituality Homepage.

    Valerie Carruthers
    Please go and "Like" Elephant Spirituality on Facebook

    • Tanya Lee Markul Tanya Lee Markul says:

      Val, thank you for always taking the time to share your energy with me. It means so much.

      I love Rainer Maria Rilke and what a fitting quote and I love your interpretation. Speaks right to my heart. A friend also reminded me of this quote today from the Tao Te Ching: When you look for it, there is nothing to see. When you listen for it, there is nothing to hear. When you use it, it is inexhaustible.

      taptaptaptap. xoxoxox

  4. Thanks for this article, Tanya, and for the video. My wife Jane came running in and said, "I love that song. I used to listen to that in college. Who is it?"

    Posted to Elephant Main Facebook Page, my Facebook page, Twitter, LinkedIn.

    Bob W. Associate Publisher
    facebook, twitter, linkedIn
    Yoga Demystified, Gita in a Nutshell

    • Tanya Lee Markul Tanya Lee Markul says:

      Thank you for the comment, Bob! Ah—that is so cool! It is Tears for Fears! I'm glad she enjoyed it as well. :-) It's one of those songs that give me a weird, but good nostalgic feeling. :-)

  5. Helen says:

    Great article. I am one of those people who wonders what it’s lilet to have a passion. I keep asking the questions. No answers yet.

  6. Andrea Balt Andréa Balt says:

    "Unique packages of creativity & purpose". Sweet. Inspiration is the most contagious disease. And after reading you I'm infected!!! :)

    xo

    PS. And I loved Adaptation.

  7. Valerie Carruthers ValCarruthers says:

    Just posted to "Popular Lately" on the Elephant Spirituality Homepage.

    Valerie Carruthers
    Please go and "Like" Elephant Spirituality on Facebook

  8. [...] everyone’s family is there for them to lean on, to call on or to go home to. Not every family is built on the premise of interconnectedness, support and stability. Sometimes family simply means that you share a bloodline. That’s all. [...]

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