What’s Up with That Earl Grey Tea? ~ Megan McWilliams

Via on Apr 15, 2013

Source: thedieline.com via RICH on Pinterest

 

Make a date with the Earl.

I was sitting at my desk last week staring at my tea cup, which is always full of some form of Earl Grey tea during the daylight hours. My love of this tea goes back far enough that I’m not really sure when I became hopelessly hooked, but it was probably my summer in England in the early 80s. That is a whole other story, but I know it was before I met and dated my wild Englishman for several years in the later 80s, because to my shock and horror he drank plain ole Lipton’s (although he did school me on the proper way to prepare a pot of tea—yes, there was a cozy involved).

Tea is one of those commodities that should be subject to Fair Trade standards and in my humble opinion should be organic and non-GMO as well—for the enjoyment and health of the tea drinker as well as those who work on the farms, which are often in faraway places where the potential for unsafe and unfair practices has been common.

It was in my afternoon early grey haze that I pondered the journey this tea made to my pantry and while I knew the brand I was drinking was all of the above (fair trade, organic, non-GMO), I wondered about how some of the other popular Earl Grey brands would compare…

Ooh! An idea!

G.D. Mizar, Gina and I decided to each do some research on one popular brand and see what we could come up with. Because there are literally thousands of types of tea, from white to green to black to red and too many herbal and flavor combinations to try to categorize, we decided to just focus on one type of tea. As I was writing this, one additional company—which is worthy of a mention—got my attention with a timely press release, so there will be four brands featured.

The main questions we asked were:

1. Where was the tea grown?

2. How was the tea grown? Using chemical fertilizers and pesticides or organically or other?

3. Who actually grew and harvested the tea, and how were they treated?

4. How much does it cost?

but first . . .

Who is this Earl Grey anyway?

earlgreyThe second Earl Grey was prime minister of England back in the 1830s, when tea drinking was already a national obsession. There are several stories about the origins of Earl Grey tea in England. One debunked legend that one of the Earl’s men saved a young Chinese boy from drowning and the grateful father presented the Earl with tea that was flavored with the oil of bergamot, which is an aromatic citrus fruit—a small orange tree (Citrus bergamia). Of course, as it turns out the Earl never went to China, so there goes that fun story. It is likely that a Chinese diplomat presented the then prime minister with a gift of this specially flavored tea, and apparently he liked it. Jacksons of Piccadilly claims to have been given the original recipe by the Earl himself back in 1830, and continue to produce it as it was originally formulated.

There are many variations, like one of my favorites—Lady Grey—which is generally Earl Grey tea with lavender and Seville oranges. But, if you are like me, you become accustomed to your favorite blend.

A little more about black tea in general.

Most of us know that tea originated in China as a medicinal drink way back around 1500—1050 B.C. Tea played and continues to play many roles in Asian cultures from a formal tea ceremony that originated in China, but was developed by Buddhist monks in Japan into a mindful art. India, which is now well-known for growing some of the most popular brands of tea in the west, was introduced to tea by the British, who were fed up with the Chinese monopoly of this addictive commodity, in the 1800s.

Tea was introduced to western culture by way of Portugal via priests and traders who had dealings with the Chinese in the 16th century. The English, who elevated tea drinking to a cultural obsession, didn’t catch on till the 17th century. Then you have the defiant Americans, who were as attached to their tea as the Brits (remember, they were still English at that point), who got all uppity because of the oppressive British tax on tea and dumped a mess of tea from English ships into Boston harbor in 1773, making tea—or the addiction to it—a catalyst in a historic revolution.

The Many Colors of Tea

Black, green and white tea is made from the camillia sinensis plant. Their ultimate color is determined by how they are processed.

I’ll take mine black—the leaves are crushed and fermented. Black tea is fully oxidized. Black tea contains theaflavins and thearubigens, which help to reduce bad cholesterol and lower the risk of stroke and heart attack. And, of course it has two to three times more caffeine (unless it is a decaffeinated variety).

Go greenthe leaves are withered and steamed. Green tea is un-oxidized, which is why it retains its color. Green tea has loads of a powerful antioxidant, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is lost in the fermentation process of black tea.

White tea?—well it isn’t actually white, but because it is made from the buds and the leaves and is oxidated in a certain way, it has a silvery appearance. It’s all good. And while it has all the health benefits of its black and green siblings, it has the most antioxidants.

Health Benefits of Black Tea

There are literally thousands of claims and studies about all varieties of tea and its benefits to our health; we have to rationalize this socially acceptable addiction, right? From increasing cardiovascular function to decreasing chances of many cancers to its effectiveness in treating intestinal stress because of its high level of tannins, tea also is credited with some surprising things.

Did you know…

  • >>Black tea prevents tooth decay because of the fluoride it contains.
  • >>Black tea is loaded with antioxidants, such as flavonoids, and is known to prevent the oxidation of LDL cholesterol, preventing damage in both the bloodstream and at artery walls, and lowering the risk of heart disease.
  • >>A compound in black tea called TF-2 causes some cancer cells to go into apoptosis (cancer cell suicide—yes!) while normal cells stay healthy.
  • >>All tea has phytochemicals. studies show that tea drinkers have stronger bones than non-tea drinkers, and these phytochemicals are the likely cause.
  • >>The list goes on and on and on…

Find out about 4 specific brands of Earl Grey in the full GD post on Earl Grey!

Please listen to the podcast of this wonderful GD show and hear the segment about Earl Grey tea! 

Megan McWilliams

Green Diva Meg (aka Megan McWilliams, host of The Green Divas Radio Show) is a TV/radio/interactive content producer, blogger, product/book/restaurant/film/anything reviewer, humorist, and recovering ex-publisher. Having fun. Keeping it green.

 

~

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Ed: K.Macku/Kate Bartolotta

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One Response to “What’s Up with That Earl Grey Tea? ~ Megan McWilliams”

  1. julie, UK says:

    I have tried tea black, white and with and without sugar. I have tried green and flavoured too. Sadly I have never found one I like. I would say that coffee is more popular than tea now here in the UK among the younger generations. In the last 2 or 3 years there has been an explosion of coffee shops opening, particularly Costa and Starbucks. I don't think us Brits still fit the old image of a tea drinking nation, not that it matters, everything changes.

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