The Key to Spiritual Practice in 150 Words.

Via on Oct 10, 2013

Friedrich lonely loneliness romantic painting

“The practice of meditation could be described as relating with cool boredom, refreshing boredom, boredom like a mountain stream. It refreshes because we do not have to do anything or expect anything. But there must be some sense of discipline if we are to get beyond the frivolity of trying to replace boredom.”

~ Chogyam Trungpa

We invite, as Thomas Merton said, “useless trouble upon ourselves” when we expect ourselves to always be moved toward spiritual practice. The fact is that many days we will not want to sit. This is where discipline comes in.

Discipline makes practice very ordinary, very boring, so our spiritual path becomes a sort of internal struggle. But in the struggle is where we find the juice.

It is precisely because we don’t want to practice that practice is a practice. Engaging in a discipline is becoming a disciple.

We are learning to worship something other than our own finicky self-interest, which is hell. We are learning how to step beyond the limitations of our self-centered framework.

We are practicing and cultivating our capacity to do what we do not want to do, and not to do what we want to do.

We are exercising our inherent freedom.

 

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Ed: Bryonie Wise


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About Alex Myles

Alex Myles is qualified as a Yoga teacher, Reiki Master, Teacher of Tibetan Meditation, Dragon Magic and a Spiritual coach to name just a few. Alex has no intention to teach others on a formal basis for many years to come, instead, she is collecting qualifications along with life’s lessons. One day, when the time is right, Alex will set up a quaint studio, in a quirky crooked building where she will breathe and appreciate the slowness of those days as life is just way too busy right now! Reading and writing has always been one of Alex’s passions. Alex likes to consider herself as a free spirit rather than a commitment-phobe. Trying to live as aligned to a Buddhist lifestyle as is possible in this day and age, she just does not believe in "owning" anything or anyone. Based on the theory that we ‘cannot lose someone that was not ours to lose’ she flails through life finding joy and magic in the most unexpected places. Mother to a 21 year old daughter and three adorable pups, she appreciates that some of the best moments in life are the 6am forest walks watching the dogs run, play and interact with one another and with nature. Connect with her on Facebook and check out her blog, Love and Madness. 

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