Do “true” Hipsters shop at Urban Outfitters?

Via on Sep 7, 2009

The term originated before and during the Beat Generation. It meant hip-to-something, awake, with it, alive, mad to live.

hipster real genuine authentic

Now hipsters sing on American Idol and have agents and use irony as a cyncial, nihilistic weapon and are not so mad to live, laugh, experiment, write bad haiku or be brave and raw and free. They’re more concerned with whether to get AA‘s vee-neck or deep vee-neck and in pink or maroon.

Hipsters used to be all about jazz, counter-culture, going vegan back when folks had to ask what that was, college radio, wearing old soft teeshirts with messages that don’t make sense, biking not because mom n’pop’d bought ‘em a new fancy fixie but because they didn’t believe in wars for oil, and most of allllll…really good, strong, fresh, fair-trade coffee.

Now, hipsters shop at Tarzhay, AA (which is eco-minded, fair labor, Made in USA), Urban Outfitters (which, at least, is a smaller indie chain). They (don’t know how to) ride their aforementioned fixies, look for nakey girls/boys in Vice and wear pricey fancy tee shirts with messages that don’t make sense.

True hipsters give a care, and their style comes…naturally.

Inspired by Adbusters, and playing devil’s advocate to Pnakotic.

Ethical Hipsters don’t shop at Urban Outfitters:

Hipsterism is about an ethos, rather than fashion. Hipsterism is traditionally about activism, art, counter-culture, an eco, individualistic way of living that runs counter to what’s “in” and “cool.”

Now, however, Hipsterism is cool. Hipsterism is mistaken for “style,” instead of “ethos.” Surface, rather than what’s inside.

Instead of the fashion coming out of the way of life, it’s the other way around.

 

For more:

10 Signs you’re a true Hipster.

About Waylon Lewis

Waylon Lewis, founder of elephant magazine, now elephantjournal.com & host of Walk the Talk Show with Waylon Lewis, is a 1st generation American Buddhist “Dharma Brat." Voted #1 in U.S. on twitter for #green two years running, Changemaker & Eco Ambassador by Treehugger, Green Hero by Discovery’s Planet Green, Best (!) Shameless Self-Promoter at Westword's Web Awards, Prominent Buddhist by Shambhala Sun, & 100 Most Influential People in Health & Fitness 2011 by "Greatist", Waylon is a mediocre climber, lazy yogi, 365-day bicycle commuter & best friend to Redford (his rescue hound). His aim: to bring the good news re: "the mindful life" beyond the choir & to all those who didn't know they gave a care. elephantjournal.com | facebook.com/elephantjournal | twitter.com/elephantjournal | facebook.com/waylonhlewis | twitter.com/waylonlewis | Google+ For more: publisherelephantjournalcom

39,492 views

Appreciate this article? Support indie media!

(We use super-secure PayPal - but don't worry - you don't need an account with PayPal.)

19 Responses to “Do “true” Hipsters shop at Urban Outfitters?”

  1. not sure what the point is ……?

    • Just what I said (though I wrote it rather late at night, so maybe not as clear as I could've been).

      Hipsterism is about an ethos, rather than fashion. Hipsterism is traditionally about activism, art, counter-culture, an eco, individualistic way of living that runs counter to what's "in" and "cool."

      Now, however, Hipsterism is cool. Hipsterism is mistaken for "style," instead of "ethos." Surface, rather than what's inside.

      Instead of the fashion coming out of the way of life, it's the other way around.

      This post was intended as a reminder, a rallying cry, for hipsters to re-embrace their traditional role as "uncool," "individualists," and troublemaking predators—instead of cool-obsessed, nihilistic, fashion-centric sheep. We need them.

  2. Kevin Post says:

    To each their own I guess; sometimes people are just trying to find themselves. Forgive them for not living up to someone else´s standards.

    P.S. I almost never see hipsters nor natural hipsters here in Medellín, Colombia so I can´t judge.

  3. ok … now i understand … I'm just not sure how useful the counter-cultural movement is generally.

    in the book 'the rebel sell' a strong case is made for how the hipsters are driving consumer culture through their constant need to be 'different' or in their seeking 'authentic' experience; since 'difference' defines 'cool' – what is hip eventually becomes square, and the hipsters move on in search of the next 'not square' thing

    strangely enough, your post reflects the sentiment of Adbusters recent cover article http://ow.ly/oiu5 which is briefly discussed on the Rebel Sell facebook discussion board http://ow.ly/oiuq

    more than being either hip or square, homogenized or organic (or in the weirdest twist on natural foods i've seen in a long time – both), perhaps we should be simply concerned with what makes sense for the long-term survival of the human species.

    ultimately this may well mean that the hipsters need to eschew their hipsterism by answering the simple question 'what would happen if everybody did this?'

  4. ok … now i understand … I'm just not sure how useful the counter-cultural movement is generally.

    in the book 'the rebel sell' a strong case is made for how the hipsters are driving consumer culture through their constant need to be 'different' or in their seeking 'authentic' experience; since 'difference' defines 'cool' – what is hip eventually becomes square, and the hipsters move on in search of the next 'not square' thing

    strangely enough, your post reflects the sentiment of Adbusters recent cover article http://ow.ly/oiu5 which is briefly discussed on the Rebel Sell facebook discussion board http://ow.ly/oiuq

    more than being either hip or square, homogenized or organic (or in the weirdest twist on natural foods i've seen in a long time – both), perhaps we should be simply concerned with what makes sense for the long-term survival of the human species.

    ultimately this may well mean that the hipsters need to eschew their hipsterism by answering the simple question 'what would happen if everybody did this?'

    • I think I actually linked to that Adbusters article, that's what the Libertarian article my post was inspired by…was inspire by.

      Loving your comments; amen to Seven Generations thinking!

  5. ellobie says:

    NO ONE should be shopping at UO or Anthro – the owner financially supports Rick Santorum. Grody.
    http://www.philadelphiaweekly.com/news-and-opinio

  6. elcarg says:

    Love the mention of college radio. One of Boulder's true treasures is Radio 1190.

  7. AlizaEss says:

    Real hipsters shop at thrift stores.

    • Kara Noel says:

      Which is why you can no longer find anything that isn't acid wash or pilly for a reasonable price at a thrift store anymore. I used to buy EVERYTHING at thrift stores. Then I moved to Boilder.

  8. Liz the aunt says:

    Urban Outfitters can't be hip. I shop there (not for clothes because they don't fit me, just the fun, kitchy stuff).

  9. [...] are tough to pin down. A true hipster, and neo-hipsters, all deny being hipsters. I’ve talked about all that in some depth [...]

  10. CC says:

    The word hipster calls up connotations for me of people that are annoying and pretentious. A true hipster would never call themselves one.

  11. Grey says:

    Fantastic post, very informative. I’m wondering why the other experts of this sector don’t notice this. You should proceed your writing. I am sure, you have a huge readers’ base already!|What’s Going down i’m new to this, I stumbled upon this I have found It positively helpful and it has helped me out loads. I am hoping to contribute & assist other users like its helped me. Good job.

  12. [...] I’ll pay my mortgage, have money to buy a PBR once in awhile, and find myself in love with a true hipster. Wouldn’t that [...]

  13. uhduhsmarty says:

    I feel like this ismore about hippes then hipsters…… there is a difference……

  14. falconbrother says:

    Very similar situation plays out with the modern biker.

  15. BobbyMcGee says:

    The thing in the article that makes me cringe is the term "true hipster". Once you get into the territory of attempting to define a "true anything" it gets messy and assumes that there is some pure and original form of something that should always be that way and that anything or anyone that doesn't conform to that definition is therefore *not* whatever they claim as a piece of their identity. I've had people tell my mom she's not a "true queer" because she ended up marrying a man and having, you guessed it, a child. So attempting to define and regulate something or someone by a set of terms that one person sees fit is something that I've always found very narrow and makes the hairs on the back of my neck stand on end. Words, culture, subjective experience, style, whatever… it's all fluid and constantly changing. Nothing in this world is concrete, nothing in this world is the "pure", "true", "real" or "original" form or way to do anything, and that is why I disagree with this article.
    Also on the comment "ethical hipsters don't shop at urban outfitters", ethical PEOPLE don't shop at Urban Outfitters, no matter what label they may apply to themselves. I would much more appreciate an entry on the workings behind Urban Outfitters than one on trying to define and compare people.

  16. Nix says:

    Though I can't say much about the clientele, there's all sorts, Urban Outfitters has hipsters at its heart. I use to work with them and they offered plenty to help arts and causes. As an employee you can submit charities that you've researched that they could donate money too and just before I left they implemented a program where if you had a creative interest that you wanted to pursue but didn't have the time and money for you could apply and write an essay (kind of like for a scholarship) and they would select people to take four weeks paid vacation time to pursue their artistic goals.

    Fun article though.

Leave a Reply